Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

One of the models of insect tympanal hearing, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, has already been the subject of numerous studies investigating membrane mechanics, neurophysiology, and ethology over the past few years in order to better understand insect hearing. Acquiring insight into the biomechanics of insect hearing is to study how their ears move; the impact of tympanal structure on frequency analysis in the locust has already been investigated using laser Doppler vibrometry to record membrane displacement (e.g. Windmill et al 2005). Thanks to this approach it is known that, in locusts, sounds of given frequencies will generate travelling waves across the tympanum that propagate to different locations depending on the frequency of the initial stimulus. Locust ears are characterized by several spatially segregated groups of mechanosensors which are tuned to different ranges of frequencies, from 1-12 kHz in the folded body region (FB), to 12-30 kHz around the pyriform vesicle (PV). These travelling waves thus allow for the incoming stimulus to be concentrated in the region of the tympanum best tuned to its frequency, a phenomenon which can be regarded as a first, mechanical step in the process of frequency analysis. The research addressed in this work applies recent technological advances in 3D micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry to measure membrane displacement. Thus, in addition to the travelling waves identified through vibration measurements in only one dimension by previous studies, this work has for the first time detected and identified membrane oscillations in three dimensions simultaneously. The results allow us to improve our understanding of the impact of membrane mechanics on frequency analysis in the locust ear.

Conference

Conference15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015)
CountryCanada
CityOttawa
Period13/07/1517/07/15

Fingerprint

Grasshoppers
Ear
Lasers
Membranes
Hearing
Insects
Middle Ear
Mechanics
Ethology
Body Regions
Neurophysiology
Vibration
Biomechanical Phenomena
Research

Keywords

  • vibrometry
  • locust ear

Cite this

Klenschi, E., Guarato, F., Windmill, J., & Jackson, J. (2015). Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry. Poster session presented at 15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015), Ottawa, Canada.
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title = "Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry",
abstract = "One of the models of insect tympanal hearing, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, has already been the subject of numerous studies investigating membrane mechanics, neurophysiology, and ethology over the past few years in order to better understand insect hearing. Acquiring insight into the biomechanics of insect hearing is to study how their ears move; the impact of tympanal structure on frequency analysis in the locust has already been investigated using laser Doppler vibrometry to record membrane displacement (e.g. Windmill et al 2005). Thanks to this approach it is known that, in locusts, sounds of given frequencies will generate travelling waves across the tympanum that propagate to different locations depending on the frequency of the initial stimulus. Locust ears are characterized by several spatially segregated groups of mechanosensors which are tuned to different ranges of frequencies, from 1-12 kHz in the folded body region (FB), to 12-30 kHz around the pyriform vesicle (PV). These travelling waves thus allow for the incoming stimulus to be concentrated in the region of the tympanum best tuned to its frequency, a phenomenon which can be regarded as a first, mechanical step in the process of frequency analysis. The research addressed in this work applies recent technological advances in 3D micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry to measure membrane displacement. Thus, in addition to the travelling waves identified through vibration measurements in only one dimension by previous studies, this work has for the first time detected and identified membrane oscillations in three dimensions simultaneously. The results allow us to improve our understanding of the impact of membrane mechanics on frequency analysis in the locust ear.",
keywords = "vibrometry, locust ear",
author = "Elizabeth Klenschi and Francesco Guarato and James Windmill and Joseph Jackson",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "16",
language = "English",
note = "15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015) ; Conference date: 13-07-2015 Through 17-07-2015",

}

Klenschi, E, Guarato, F, Windmill, J & Jackson, J 2015, 'Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry' 15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015), Ottawa, Canada, 13/07/15 - 17/07/15, .

Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry. / Klenschi, Elizabeth; Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Jackson, Joseph.

2015. Poster session presented at 15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015), Ottawa, Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

AU - Klenschi, Elizabeth

AU - Guarato, Francesco

AU - Windmill, James

AU - Jackson, Joseph

PY - 2015/7/16

Y1 - 2015/7/16

N2 - One of the models of insect tympanal hearing, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, has already been the subject of numerous studies investigating membrane mechanics, neurophysiology, and ethology over the past few years in order to better understand insect hearing. Acquiring insight into the biomechanics of insect hearing is to study how their ears move; the impact of tympanal structure on frequency analysis in the locust has already been investigated using laser Doppler vibrometry to record membrane displacement (e.g. Windmill et al 2005). Thanks to this approach it is known that, in locusts, sounds of given frequencies will generate travelling waves across the tympanum that propagate to different locations depending on the frequency of the initial stimulus. Locust ears are characterized by several spatially segregated groups of mechanosensors which are tuned to different ranges of frequencies, from 1-12 kHz in the folded body region (FB), to 12-30 kHz around the pyriform vesicle (PV). These travelling waves thus allow for the incoming stimulus to be concentrated in the region of the tympanum best tuned to its frequency, a phenomenon which can be regarded as a first, mechanical step in the process of frequency analysis. The research addressed in this work applies recent technological advances in 3D micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry to measure membrane displacement. Thus, in addition to the travelling waves identified through vibration measurements in only one dimension by previous studies, this work has for the first time detected and identified membrane oscillations in three dimensions simultaneously. The results allow us to improve our understanding of the impact of membrane mechanics on frequency analysis in the locust ear.

AB - One of the models of insect tympanal hearing, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, has already been the subject of numerous studies investigating membrane mechanics, neurophysiology, and ethology over the past few years in order to better understand insect hearing. Acquiring insight into the biomechanics of insect hearing is to study how their ears move; the impact of tympanal structure on frequency analysis in the locust has already been investigated using laser Doppler vibrometry to record membrane displacement (e.g. Windmill et al 2005). Thanks to this approach it is known that, in locusts, sounds of given frequencies will generate travelling waves across the tympanum that propagate to different locations depending on the frequency of the initial stimulus. Locust ears are characterized by several spatially segregated groups of mechanosensors which are tuned to different ranges of frequencies, from 1-12 kHz in the folded body region (FB), to 12-30 kHz around the pyriform vesicle (PV). These travelling waves thus allow for the incoming stimulus to be concentrated in the region of the tympanum best tuned to its frequency, a phenomenon which can be regarded as a first, mechanical step in the process of frequency analysis. The research addressed in this work applies recent technological advances in 3D micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry to measure membrane displacement. Thus, in addition to the travelling waves identified through vibration measurements in only one dimension by previous studies, this work has for the first time detected and identified membrane oscillations in three dimensions simultaneously. The results allow us to improve our understanding of the impact of membrane mechanics on frequency analysis in the locust ear.

KW - vibrometry

KW - locust ear

M3 - Poster

ER -

Klenschi E, Guarato F, Windmill J, Jackson J. Biomechanical investigation of the locust ear with 3D laser Doppler vibrometry. 2015. Poster session presented at 15th Invertebrate Sound and Vibration (ISV2015), Ottawa, Canada.