Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Infection of in-dwelling medical devices, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus species, can be particularly problematic when pathogenesis involves formation of a biofilm. Consequences of an infection can be severe, often requiring device removal due to the difficulties in delivering a dose of antimicrobial high enough to eradicate a biofilm at the site of infection - this is complicated further if the device in question is not designed to be easily removed. There is currently much focus on the development of methods for prevention of device-related infections, and biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology has great potential for this application. In this study, the polymer PLGA (Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid(65:35)) has been formulated with the broad spectrum antibiotic rifampicin, at ratios 50:50 and 60:40 PLGA:rifampicin, and the in vitro drug release and antimicrobial activity analysed. The formulations were coated on glass coverslips and stored in PBS at 37°C; 120rpm. Over a period of 4 weeks both formulations steadily released the majority of their drug load (>94%), and were able to produce large zones of inhibition against S. aureus (>34mm) in a disk diffusion test. Furthermore, both formulations successfully inhibited in vitro biofilm formation when compared to PLGA alone with a 5 log reduction in CFU/ml (99.999%). The results of this study indicate that biodegradable polymers could potentially be used for delivering a high local dose of antimicrobial at device implant sites, and may therefore represent a promising method for infection prevention.

Conference

ConferenceHealthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018
Abbreviated titleHIS 2018
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period26/11/1828/11/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Biodegradable polymers
Biofilms
Drug delivery
Antibiotics
Glass
Acids
Polymers

Keywords

  • implanted medical device
  • infection
  • drug delivery technology

Cite this

Fraser, J., MacLean, M., & McCormick, C. (2018). Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection. Poster session presented at Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
Fraser, Justine ; MacLean, Michelle ; McCormick, Christopher. / Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection. Poster session presented at Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
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abstract = "Infection of in-dwelling medical devices, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus species, can be particularly problematic when pathogenesis involves formation of a biofilm. Consequences of an infection can be severe, often requiring device removal due to the difficulties in delivering a dose of antimicrobial high enough to eradicate a biofilm at the site of infection - this is complicated further if the device in question is not designed to be easily removed. There is currently much focus on the development of methods for prevention of device-related infections, and biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology has great potential for this application. In this study, the polymer PLGA (Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid(65:35)) has been formulated with the broad spectrum antibiotic rifampicin, at ratios 50:50 and 60:40 PLGA:rifampicin, and the in vitro drug release and antimicrobial activity analysed. The formulations were coated on glass coverslips and stored in PBS at 37°C; 120rpm. Over a period of 4 weeks both formulations steadily released the majority of their drug load (>94{\%}), and were able to produce large zones of inhibition against S. aureus (>34mm) in a disk diffusion test. Furthermore, both formulations successfully inhibited in vitro biofilm formation when compared to PLGA alone with a 5 log reduction in CFU/ml (99.999{\%}). The results of this study indicate that biodegradable polymers could potentially be used for delivering a high local dose of antimicrobial at device implant sites, and may therefore represent a promising method for infection prevention.",
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Fraser, J, MacLean, M & McCormick, C 2018, 'Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection' Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018, Liverpool, United Kingdom, 26/11/18 - 28/11/18, .

Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection. / Fraser, Justine; MacLean, Michelle; McCormick, Christopher.

2018. Poster session presented at Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection

AU - Fraser, Justine

AU - MacLean, Michelle

AU - McCormick, Christopher

PY - 2018/11/26

Y1 - 2018/11/26

N2 - Infection of in-dwelling medical devices, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus species, can be particularly problematic when pathogenesis involves formation of a biofilm. Consequences of an infection can be severe, often requiring device removal due to the difficulties in delivering a dose of antimicrobial high enough to eradicate a biofilm at the site of infection - this is complicated further if the device in question is not designed to be easily removed. There is currently much focus on the development of methods for prevention of device-related infections, and biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology has great potential for this application. In this study, the polymer PLGA (Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid(65:35)) has been formulated with the broad spectrum antibiotic rifampicin, at ratios 50:50 and 60:40 PLGA:rifampicin, and the in vitro drug release and antimicrobial activity analysed. The formulations were coated on glass coverslips and stored in PBS at 37°C; 120rpm. Over a period of 4 weeks both formulations steadily released the majority of their drug load (>94%), and were able to produce large zones of inhibition against S. aureus (>34mm) in a disk diffusion test. Furthermore, both formulations successfully inhibited in vitro biofilm formation when compared to PLGA alone with a 5 log reduction in CFU/ml (99.999%). The results of this study indicate that biodegradable polymers could potentially be used for delivering a high local dose of antimicrobial at device implant sites, and may therefore represent a promising method for infection prevention.

AB - Infection of in-dwelling medical devices, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus species, can be particularly problematic when pathogenesis involves formation of a biofilm. Consequences of an infection can be severe, often requiring device removal due to the difficulties in delivering a dose of antimicrobial high enough to eradicate a biofilm at the site of infection - this is complicated further if the device in question is not designed to be easily removed. There is currently much focus on the development of methods for prevention of device-related infections, and biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology has great potential for this application. In this study, the polymer PLGA (Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid(65:35)) has been formulated with the broad spectrum antibiotic rifampicin, at ratios 50:50 and 60:40 PLGA:rifampicin, and the in vitro drug release and antimicrobial activity analysed. The formulations were coated on glass coverslips and stored in PBS at 37°C; 120rpm. Over a period of 4 weeks both formulations steadily released the majority of their drug load (>94%), and were able to produce large zones of inhibition against S. aureus (>34mm) in a disk diffusion test. Furthermore, both formulations successfully inhibited in vitro biofilm formation when compared to PLGA alone with a 5 log reduction in CFU/ml (99.999%). The results of this study indicate that biodegradable polymers could potentially be used for delivering a high local dose of antimicrobial at device implant sites, and may therefore represent a promising method for infection prevention.

KW - implanted medical device

KW - infection

KW - drug delivery technology

M3 - Poster

ER -

Fraser J, MacLean M, McCormick C. Biodegradable polymer drug delivery technology to prevent implanted medical device infection. 2018. Poster session presented at Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) Conference 2018, Liverpool, United Kingdom.