Bio-inspired 3D-printed piezoelectric device for acoustic frequency selection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Development of 3D-printed devices, sensors, and actuators has become increasingly popular in recent years due to low cost, rapid production, and device personalization. This personalization process allows the development of devices with unique physical properties and phenomena that enhance the desired properties of the 3D-printed part. Biomimetics is a technique used to develop engineered devices, as organisms present in nature can provide smart and simple solutions to complex problems across a wide range of applications. Locust ears have a simple tympanic membrane with varying thicknesses that allows acoustic frequency selection, as well as presenting nonlinear phenomena. This acoustic frequency selection assists the insect in predation and swarming. This work presents the development of a piezoelectric polymeric material that has been used to 3D-print a new frequency selective piezoelectric sensor inspired by the locust’s tympanic membrane. Such 3D-printing of functional sensors and actuators provides an insight into the development and enhancement of polymer-based science, with exciting and promising potential for the near future.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSensors and Actuators A: Physical
Volume271
Early online date28 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Piezoelectric devices
acoustic frequencies
locusts
Acoustics
Sensors
Actuators
Membranes
sensors
swarming
Piezoelectric materials
actuators
Biomimetics
Polymers
membranes
insects
Printing
biomimetics
ear
Physical properties
organisms

Keywords

  • locust
  • biomimesis
  • piezoelectric
  • polymer
  • 3D-printing

Cite this

@article{162ea35edb7a45e4b3396f9ba03be9dc,
title = "Bio-inspired 3D-printed piezoelectric device for acoustic frequency selection",
abstract = "Development of 3D-printed devices, sensors, and actuators has become increasingly popular in recent years due to low cost, rapid production, and device personalization. This personalization process allows the development of devices with unique physical properties and phenomena that enhance the desired properties of the 3D-printed part. Biomimetics is a technique used to develop engineered devices, as organisms present in nature can provide smart and simple solutions to complex problems across a wide range of applications. Locust ears have a simple tympanic membrane with varying thicknesses that allows acoustic frequency selection, as well as presenting nonlinear phenomena. This acoustic frequency selection assists the insect in predation and swarming. This work presents the development of a piezoelectric polymeric material that has been used to 3D-print a new frequency selective piezoelectric sensor inspired by the locust’s tympanic membrane. Such 3D-printing of functional sensors and actuators provides an insight into the development and enhancement of polymer-based science, with exciting and promising potential for the near future.",
keywords = "locust, biomimesis, piezoelectric, polymer, 3D-printing",
author = "Roger Domingo-Roca and Benjamin Tiller and Jackson, {Joseph Curt} and Windmill, {James Frederick Charles}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
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doi = "10.1016/j.sna.2017.12.056",
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journal = "Sensors and Actuators A: Physical",
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T1 - Bio-inspired 3D-printed piezoelectric device for acoustic frequency selection

AU - Domingo-Roca, Roger

AU - Tiller, Benjamin

AU - Jackson, Joseph Curt

AU - Windmill, James Frederick Charles

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Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - Development of 3D-printed devices, sensors, and actuators has become increasingly popular in recent years due to low cost, rapid production, and device personalization. This personalization process allows the development of devices with unique physical properties and phenomena that enhance the desired properties of the 3D-printed part. Biomimetics is a technique used to develop engineered devices, as organisms present in nature can provide smart and simple solutions to complex problems across a wide range of applications. Locust ears have a simple tympanic membrane with varying thicknesses that allows acoustic frequency selection, as well as presenting nonlinear phenomena. This acoustic frequency selection assists the insect in predation and swarming. This work presents the development of a piezoelectric polymeric material that has been used to 3D-print a new frequency selective piezoelectric sensor inspired by the locust’s tympanic membrane. Such 3D-printing of functional sensors and actuators provides an insight into the development and enhancement of polymer-based science, with exciting and promising potential for the near future.

AB - Development of 3D-printed devices, sensors, and actuators has become increasingly popular in recent years due to low cost, rapid production, and device personalization. This personalization process allows the development of devices with unique physical properties and phenomena that enhance the desired properties of the 3D-printed part. Biomimetics is a technique used to develop engineered devices, as organisms present in nature can provide smart and simple solutions to complex problems across a wide range of applications. Locust ears have a simple tympanic membrane with varying thicknesses that allows acoustic frequency selection, as well as presenting nonlinear phenomena. This acoustic frequency selection assists the insect in predation and swarming. This work presents the development of a piezoelectric polymeric material that has been used to 3D-print a new frequency selective piezoelectric sensor inspired by the locust’s tympanic membrane. Such 3D-printing of functional sensors and actuators provides an insight into the development and enhancement of polymer-based science, with exciting and promising potential for the near future.

KW - locust

KW - biomimesis

KW - piezoelectric

KW - polymer

KW - 3D-printing

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