Beyond Scotland : new contexts for Twentieth-Century Scottish literature

David Goldie, Gerard Carruthers, Alistair Renfrew

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Scottish creative writing in the twentieth century was notable for its willingness to explore and absorb the literatures of other times and other nations. From the engagement with Russian literature of Hugh MacDiarmid and Edwin Morgan, through to the interplay with continental literary theory, Scottish writers have proved active participants in a diverse international literary practice. Scottish criticism has, arguably, often been slow in appreciating the full extent of this exchange. Preoccupied with marking out its territory, with identifying an independent and distinctive tradition, Scottish criticism has occasionally blinded itself to the diversity and range of its writers. In stressing the importance of cultural independence, it has tended to overlook the many virtues of interdependence.

LanguageEnglish
Number of pages267
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Scottish Literature
Criticism
Writer
Scotland
Continental
Willingness
Creative Writing
Interdependence
Literary Theory
Russian Literature

Keywords

  • literature
  • language
  • Scotland
  • writing

Cite this

Goldie, David ; Carruthers, Gerard ; Renfrew, Alistair. / Beyond Scotland : new contexts for Twentieth-Century Scottish literature. 2004. 267 p.
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Beyond Scotland : new contexts for Twentieth-Century Scottish literature. / Goldie, David; Carruthers, Gerard; Renfrew, Alistair.

2004. 267 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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