Balancing our energy portfolio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

• Scotland is set to lose over half its current electricity generating capacity due to closure of the coal-fired and nuclear power stations. • Scotland will then become a net importer of electricity generated from England and Wales.
• Under current UK policy, Scotland’s imported power will come from the proposed new fleet of nuclear power stations and from existing gas-fired power stations.
• Reducing Scottish and UK coal consumption to meet carbon targets may increase gas consumption for power production.
• The options for meeting future demand are: reducing demand, increasing onshore energy production, increasing offshore production; and increasing imports.
• Decisions have to be made on how to meet future energy requirements and what level of energy security risk is acceptable.
• Public education and debate is essential to avoid crisis decision-making
LanguageEnglish
Pages36-38
Number of pages3
JournalThe Journal of the Foundation for Science and Technology
Volume21
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2016

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nuclear power plant
electricity
Nuclear power plants
coal-fired power plant
Electricity
gas
Coal
import
energy
power plant
Energy security
decision making
education
coal
Gases
carbon
Education
Decision making
Carbon
demand

Keywords

  • nuclear power
  • energy policy
  • Scotland
  • energy portfolio
  • renewable energy
  • energy future

Cite this

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Balancing our energy portfolio. / Lunn, Rebecca.

In: The Journal of the Foundation for Science and Technology, Vol. 21, No. 7, 31.03.2016, p. 36-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lunn, Rebecca

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AB - • Scotland is set to lose over half its current electricity generating capacity due to closure of the coal-fired and nuclear power stations. • Scotland will then become a net importer of electricity generated from England and Wales. • Under current UK policy, Scotland’s imported power will come from the proposed new fleet of nuclear power stations and from existing gas-fired power stations. • Reducing Scottish and UK coal consumption to meet carbon targets may increase gas consumption for power production. • The options for meeting future demand are: reducing demand, increasing onshore energy production, increasing offshore production; and increasing imports. • Decisions have to be made on how to meet future energy requirements and what level of energy security risk is acceptable. • Public education and debate is essential to avoid crisis decision-making

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KW - energy policy

KW - Scotland

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KW - renewable energy

KW - energy future

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