Back in contention? the Conservatives' electoral prospects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article assesses whether the Conservatives are likely to be serious contenders for power at the next British general election. First it assesses how well the party will have to do to 'win' the election. Second, it considers whether the record of the polls since 2005 suggests the party is capable of securing the necessary support. Third, the article assesses whether the ideological mood of the electorate has moved closer to the Conservatives since 2005. Finally it considers whether the image of the party has improved. The Conservatives are likely to have to outpoll Labour by a considerable margin to become the largest party but their record in opinion polls suggests they could achieve this. The ideological mood of the electorate has moved closer to the party, while David Cameron is a relatively popular leader. But the party has still not fully restored its reputation for economic competence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-183
Number of pages11
JournalPolitical Quarterly
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

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Keywords

  • Conservative party
  • voting behaviour
  • Britain
  • general election
  • opinion polls
  • electoral system

Cite this

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Back in contention? the Conservatives' electoral prospects. / Curtice, J.K.

In: Political Quarterly, Vol. 80, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 172-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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