Attributions of stability, control and responsibility: how parents of children with intellectual disabilities view their child's problematic behaviour and its causes

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Abstract

Background: Children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of behaviour problems. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ causal beliefs and attributions for general problematic child behaviour in children with different aetiologies of ID. Materials and Methods: Ten parents of children with ID participated in interviews about their child’s problematic behaviour. Results: Thematic analysis revealed that parents viewed their child’s problematic behaviour as caused by the child’s ID, by environmental shortcomings, and by other factors unrelated to the ID. Some causes were viewed as stable and uncontrollable and others as unstable and controllable. Additionally, parents showed a strong sense of responsibility for child behaviour. Conclusions: Parents of children with ID do not solely interpret their child’s problematic behaviour through the ID but incorporate the environment and non-ID-related causes and attributions which may help to promote more effective parenting.
LanguageEnglish
Pages58-70
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume29
Issue number1
Early online date5 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Disabled Children
Child Behavior
Intellectual Disability
attribution
parents
Parents
disability
responsibility
cause
Parenting
sense of responsibility
Interviews

Keywords

  • parenting
  • intellectual disability
  • child behaviour
  • causal attributions
  • causal beliefs
  • thematic analysis

Cite this

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title = "Attributions of stability, control and responsibility: how parents of children with intellectual disabilities view their child's problematic behaviour and its causes",
abstract = "Background: Children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of behaviour problems. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ causal beliefs and attributions for general problematic child behaviour in children with different aetiologies of ID. Materials and Methods: Ten parents of children with ID participated in interviews about their child’s problematic behaviour. Results: Thematic analysis revealed that parents viewed their child’s problematic behaviour as caused by the child’s ID, by environmental shortcomings, and by other factors unrelated to the ID. Some causes were viewed as stable and uncontrollable and others as unstable and controllable. Additionally, parents showed a strong sense of responsibility for child behaviour. Conclusions: Parents of children with ID do not solely interpret their child’s problematic behaviour through the ID but incorporate the environment and non-ID-related causes and attributions which may help to promote more effective parenting.",
keywords = "parenting, intellectual disability, child behaviour, causal attributions, causal beliefs, thematic analysis",
author = "Myrthe Jacobs and Lisa Woolfson and Hunter, {Simon C.}",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Jacobs, M., Woolfson, L., & Hunter, S. C. (2015). Attributions of stability, control and responsibility: how parents of children with intellectual disabilities view their child’s problematic behaviour and its causes. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 29(1), 58-70, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12158. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.",
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