Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea

Sohee Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Boram Lee, Aesun Shin, Kyu-Won Jung, Duk-Hee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-Il Cho, Sue Kyung Park, Mathieu Boniol, Paolo Boffetta, Elisabete Weiderpass

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the Republic of Korea, cancer is the most common cause of death, and cancer incidence and mortality rates are the highest in East Asia. As alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic to humans, we estimated the burden of cancer related to alcohol consumption in the Korean population. METHODS: The cancer sites studied were those for which there is convincing evidence of a positive association with alcohol consumption: oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx and female breast. Sex- and cancer-specific population attributable fractions (PAF) were calculated based on: 1) the prevalence of alcohol drinkers among adults ≥ 20 years of age in 1989; 2) the average daily alcohol consumption (g/day) among drinkers in 1998; 3) relative risk (RR) estimates for the association between alcohol consumption and site-specific cancer incidence obtained either from a large Korean cohort study or, when more than one Korean study was available for a specific cancer site, meta-analyses were performed and the resulting meta-RRs were used; 4) national cancer incidence and mortality data from 2009. RESULTS: Among men, 3% (2,866 cases) of incident cancer cases and 2.8% (1,234 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. Among women, 0.5% (464 cancer cases) of incident cancers and 0.1% (32 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. In particular, the PAF for alcohol consumption in relation to oral cavity cancer incidence among Korean men was 29.3%, and the PAFs for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer incidence were 43.3% and 25.8%, respectively. Among Korean women, the PAF for colorectal cancer incidence was the highest (4.2%) and that for breast cancer incidence was only 0.2%. Avoiding alcohol consumption, or reducing it from the median of the highest 4th quartile of consumption (56.0 g/day for men, 28.0 g/day for women) to the median of the lowest quartile (2.80 g/day for men, 0.80 g/day for women), would reduce the burden of alcohol-related cancers in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in alcohol consumption would decrease the cancer burden and a significant impact is anticipated specifically for the cancers oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx among men in the Republic of Korea.
Original languageEnglish
Article number420
Number of pages12
JournalCancer
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jun 2014

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Republic of Korea
Alcohol Drinking
Mortality
Incidence
Population
Neoplasms
Mouth
Mouth Neoplasms
Larynx
Pharynx
Alcohols
Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Alcoholic Beverages
Laryngeal Neoplasms
Far East
Korea
Rectum

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • adult
  • aged
  • alcohol drinking
  • female
  • humans
  • male
  • middle aged
  • neoplasms
  • Republic of Korea
  • risk factors
  • sex characteristics

Cite this

Park, Sohee ; Shin, Hai-Rim ; Lee, Boram ; Shin, Aesun ; Jung, Kyu-Won ; Lee, Duk-Hee ; Jee, Sun Ha ; Cho, Sung-Il ; Park, Sue Kyung ; Boniol, Mathieu ; Boffetta, Paolo ; Weiderpass, Elisabete. / Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea. In: Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 14.
@article{adde5f4d14a9453eb190cd4d28413ffa,
title = "Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In the Republic of Korea, cancer is the most common cause of death, and cancer incidence and mortality rates are the highest in East Asia. As alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic to humans, we estimated the burden of cancer related to alcohol consumption in the Korean population. METHODS: The cancer sites studied were those for which there is convincing evidence of a positive association with alcohol consumption: oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx and female breast. Sex- and cancer-specific population attributable fractions (PAF) were calculated based on: 1) the prevalence of alcohol drinkers among adults ≥ 20 years of age in 1989; 2) the average daily alcohol consumption (g/day) among drinkers in 1998; 3) relative risk (RR) estimates for the association between alcohol consumption and site-specific cancer incidence obtained either from a large Korean cohort study or, when more than one Korean study was available for a specific cancer site, meta-analyses were performed and the resulting meta-RRs were used; 4) national cancer incidence and mortality data from 2009. RESULTS: Among men, 3{\%} (2,866 cases) of incident cancer cases and 2.8{\%} (1,234 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. Among women, 0.5{\%} (464 cancer cases) of incident cancers and 0.1{\%} (32 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. In particular, the PAF for alcohol consumption in relation to oral cavity cancer incidence among Korean men was 29.3{\%}, and the PAFs for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer incidence were 43.3{\%} and 25.8{\%}, respectively. Among Korean women, the PAF for colorectal cancer incidence was the highest (4.2{\%}) and that for breast cancer incidence was only 0.2{\%}. Avoiding alcohol consumption, or reducing it from the median of the highest 4th quartile of consumption (56.0 g/day for men, 28.0 g/day for women) to the median of the lowest quartile (2.80 g/day for men, 0.80 g/day for women), would reduce the burden of alcohol-related cancers in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in alcohol consumption would decrease the cancer burden and a significant impact is anticipated specifically for the cancers oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx among men in the Republic of Korea.",
keywords = "adolescent, adult, aged, alcohol drinking, female, humans, male, middle aged, neoplasms, Republic of Korea, risk factors, sex characteristics",
author = "Sohee Park and Hai-Rim Shin and Boram Lee and Aesun Shin and Kyu-Won Jung and Duk-Hee Lee and Jee, {Sun Ha} and Sung-Il Cho and Park, {Sue Kyung} and Mathieu Boniol and Paolo Boffetta and Elisabete Weiderpass",
year = "2014",
month = "6",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2407-14-420",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "Cancer",
issn = "0008-543X",

}

Park, S, Shin, H-R, Lee, B, Shin, A, Jung, K-W, Lee, D-H, Jee, SH, Cho, S-I, Park, SK, Boniol, M, Boffetta, P & Weiderpass, E 2014, 'Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea', Cancer, vol. 14, 420. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-14-420

Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea. / Park, Sohee; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lee, Boram; Shin, Aesun; Jung, Kyu-Won; Lee, Duk-Hee; Jee, Sun Ha; Cho, Sung-Il; Park, Sue Kyung; Boniol, Mathieu; Boffetta, Paolo; Weiderpass, Elisabete.

In: Cancer, Vol. 14, 420, 10.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea

AU - Park, Sohee

AU - Shin, Hai-Rim

AU - Lee, Boram

AU - Shin, Aesun

AU - Jung, Kyu-Won

AU - Lee, Duk-Hee

AU - Jee, Sun Ha

AU - Cho, Sung-Il

AU - Park, Sue Kyung

AU - Boniol, Mathieu

AU - Boffetta, Paolo

AU - Weiderpass, Elisabete

PY - 2014/6/10

Y1 - 2014/6/10

N2 - BACKGROUND: In the Republic of Korea, cancer is the most common cause of death, and cancer incidence and mortality rates are the highest in East Asia. As alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic to humans, we estimated the burden of cancer related to alcohol consumption in the Korean population. METHODS: The cancer sites studied were those for which there is convincing evidence of a positive association with alcohol consumption: oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx and female breast. Sex- and cancer-specific population attributable fractions (PAF) were calculated based on: 1) the prevalence of alcohol drinkers among adults ≥ 20 years of age in 1989; 2) the average daily alcohol consumption (g/day) among drinkers in 1998; 3) relative risk (RR) estimates for the association between alcohol consumption and site-specific cancer incidence obtained either from a large Korean cohort study or, when more than one Korean study was available for a specific cancer site, meta-analyses were performed and the resulting meta-RRs were used; 4) national cancer incidence and mortality data from 2009. RESULTS: Among men, 3% (2,866 cases) of incident cancer cases and 2.8% (1,234 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. Among women, 0.5% (464 cancer cases) of incident cancers and 0.1% (32 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. In particular, the PAF for alcohol consumption in relation to oral cavity cancer incidence among Korean men was 29.3%, and the PAFs for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer incidence were 43.3% and 25.8%, respectively. Among Korean women, the PAF for colorectal cancer incidence was the highest (4.2%) and that for breast cancer incidence was only 0.2%. Avoiding alcohol consumption, or reducing it from the median of the highest 4th quartile of consumption (56.0 g/day for men, 28.0 g/day for women) to the median of the lowest quartile (2.80 g/day for men, 0.80 g/day for women), would reduce the burden of alcohol-related cancers in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in alcohol consumption would decrease the cancer burden and a significant impact is anticipated specifically for the cancers oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx among men in the Republic of Korea.

AB - BACKGROUND: In the Republic of Korea, cancer is the most common cause of death, and cancer incidence and mortality rates are the highest in East Asia. As alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic to humans, we estimated the burden of cancer related to alcohol consumption in the Korean population. METHODS: The cancer sites studied were those for which there is convincing evidence of a positive association with alcohol consumption: oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx and female breast. Sex- and cancer-specific population attributable fractions (PAF) were calculated based on: 1) the prevalence of alcohol drinkers among adults ≥ 20 years of age in 1989; 2) the average daily alcohol consumption (g/day) among drinkers in 1998; 3) relative risk (RR) estimates for the association between alcohol consumption and site-specific cancer incidence obtained either from a large Korean cohort study or, when more than one Korean study was available for a specific cancer site, meta-analyses were performed and the resulting meta-RRs were used; 4) national cancer incidence and mortality data from 2009. RESULTS: Among men, 3% (2,866 cases) of incident cancer cases and 2.8% (1,234 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. Among women, 0.5% (464 cancer cases) of incident cancers and 0.1% (32 deaths) of cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol consumption. In particular, the PAF for alcohol consumption in relation to oral cavity cancer incidence among Korean men was 29.3%, and the PAFs for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer incidence were 43.3% and 25.8%, respectively. Among Korean women, the PAF for colorectal cancer incidence was the highest (4.2%) and that for breast cancer incidence was only 0.2%. Avoiding alcohol consumption, or reducing it from the median of the highest 4th quartile of consumption (56.0 g/day for men, 28.0 g/day for women) to the median of the lowest quartile (2.80 g/day for men, 0.80 g/day for women), would reduce the burden of alcohol-related cancers in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in alcohol consumption would decrease the cancer burden and a significant impact is anticipated specifically for the cancers oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx among men in the Republic of Korea.

KW - adolescent

KW - adult

KW - aged

KW - alcohol drinking

KW - female

KW - humans

KW - male

KW - middle aged

KW - neoplasms

KW - Republic of Korea

KW - risk factors

KW - sex characteristics

UR - http://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2407-14-420

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2407-14-420

DO - 10.1186/1471-2407-14-420

M3 - Article

VL - 14

JO - Cancer

JF - Cancer

SN - 0008-543X

M1 - 420

ER -