'At what cost? the impact of UK long-term care funding policies on social work practice with older people': a literature review

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Abstract

Moving to a care home is a significant and often costly milestone in many older people’s lives, with considerable implications for an individual’s future autonomy, safety, wellbeing and security. Such provision has considerable financial impact both on the economy and on those required to make significant contributions to their own care. Reductions in community-based support and widespread gaps in the sustainable development of alternative options to residential care pose challenges in relation to decision-making for those older people and their carers who wish to make timely plans for good quality provision. The system and process of transfer to care can also be fragmented, bewildering and involve multiple organisations and assessments, often at a time of crisis. Social Workers are key professionals in providing assessment, advocacy and planning with older people and their carers and the challenging neo-liberal policy context suggests the potential for numerous ethical dilemmas for practitioners.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-243
Number of pages14
JournalEthics & Social Welfare
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Aug 2018

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funding policy
Long-Term Care
Social Work
Caregivers
social work
Costs and Cost Analysis
Conservation of Natural Resources
Home Care Services
costs
Decision Making
Organizations
home care
Safety
social worker
sustainable development
autonomy
decision making
planning
economy
community

Keywords

  • older people
  • gerontology
  • care hones
  • funding
  • ethics
  • choice
  • decision making
  • UK policy
  • literature review

Cite this

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title = "'At what cost? the impact of UK long-term care funding policies on social work practice with older people': a literature review",
abstract = "Moving to a care home is a significant and often costly milestone in many older people’s lives, with considerable implications for an individual’s future autonomy, safety, wellbeing and security. Such provision has considerable financial impact both on the economy and on those required to make significant contributions to their own care. Reductions in community-based support and widespread gaps in the sustainable development of alternative options to residential care pose challenges in relation to decision-making for those older people and their carers who wish to make timely plans for good quality provision. The system and process of transfer to care can also be fragmented, bewildering and involve multiple organisations and assessments, often at a time of crisis. Social Workers are key professionals in providing assessment, advocacy and planning with older people and their carers and the challenging neo-liberal policy context suggests the potential for numerous ethical dilemmas for practitioners.",
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author = "Alison Higgs and Trish Hafford-Letchfield",
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KW - gerontology

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KW - choice

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