Astronautical engineering revisited: planetary orbit modification using solar radiation pressure

C.R. McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the Sun evolves along the main sequence its luminosity will grow, leading to a steadily increasing solar flux at the Earth with corresponding catastrophic consequences for the biosphere. A novel means of avoiding this terminal route to human evolution has recently been proposed by Korycansky et al. which utilises a series of grazing fly-pasts of the Earth with a small solar system body to increase the orbit radius of the Earth over a timescale of order 109 years. This short paper will propose an alternative strategy which utilises a large reflective sail to generate a propulsive thrust due to solar radiation pressure. It will be shown that if the sail is configured to be in static equilibrium relative to the Earth, the centre-of-mass of the Earth-sail system slowly accelerates. This scheme offers some advantages in that the mass of the sail is four orders of magnitude less than the mass to be processed in the scheme of Korycanskyet al. for trajectory correction manoeuvres alone. In addition, the severe hazard posed by multiple grazing fly-pasts of the Earth by a small solar system body is avoided. Although offering significant advantages, any thoughts of engineering on an astronomical scale clearly requires a leap of the imagination and a ready use of liberal assumptions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages765-772
Number of pages7
JournalAstrophysics and Space Science
Volume282
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

planetary orbits
radiation pressure
solar radiation
ice ridge
engineering
grazing
solar system
human evolution
biosphere
solar flux
maneuvers
thrust
hazards
center of mass
sun
trajectory
routes
luminosity
hazard
trajectories

Keywords

  • planetary orbits
  • space
  • solar radiation
  • astronautical engineering

Cite this

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Astronautical engineering revisited: planetary orbit modification using solar radiation pressure. / McInnes, C.R.

In: Astrophysics and Space Science, Vol. 282, No. 4, 2002, p. 765-772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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