Associations between pedometer determined physical activity and adiposity in children and adolescents

María L. Miguel-Berges, John J. Reilly, Luis A. Moreno Aznar, David Jiménez Pavón

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present review sought to examine the evidence on the associations between pedometer-determined physical activity and adiposity.
Design: Of 304 potentially eligible articles, 36 were included. A search for observational studies was carried out using Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), the OVID (MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO), EBSCOhost (Sportdiscus), and PEDro database from their commenced to July 2015. Of 304 potentially eligible articles, 36 were included.
Results: Most studies (30/36; 83%) were cross sectional and all used proxies for adiposity, such as body mass index (BMI) or BMI z-score as the outcome measure. Few studies (2/36; 6%) focused on preschool children. There was consistent evidence of negative associations between walking and adiposity; significant negative associations were observed in 72% (26/36) of studies overall.
Conclusions: The present review supports the hypothesis that higher levels of walking are protective against child and adolescent obesity. However, prospective longitudinal studies are warranted; there is a need for more research on younger children and for more “dose-response” evidence.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Early online date12 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Pediatric Obesity
Exercise
adolescent
Walking
Body Mass Index
evidence
Proxy
Preschool Children
preschool child
MEDLINE
Libraries
Observational Studies
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Prospective Studies
Research

Keywords

  • pedometers
  • physical activity
  • obesity
  • child
  • adolescent

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: The present review sought to examine the evidence on the associations between pedometer-determined physical activity and adiposity.Design: Of 304 potentially eligible articles, 36 were included. A search for observational studies was carried out using Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), the OVID (MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO), EBSCOhost (Sportdiscus), and PEDro database from their commenced to July 2015. Of 304 potentially eligible articles, 36 were included.Results: Most studies (30/36; 83{\%}) were cross sectional and all used proxies for adiposity, such as body mass index (BMI) or BMI z-score as the outcome measure. Few studies (2/36; 6{\%}) focused on preschool children. There was consistent evidence of negative associations between walking and adiposity; significant negative associations were observed in 72{\%} (26/36) of studies overall.Conclusions: The present review supports the hypothesis that higher levels of walking are protective against child and adolescent obesity. However, prospective longitudinal studies are warranted; there is a need for more research on younger children and for more “dose-response” evidence.",
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Associations between pedometer determined physical activity and adiposity in children and adolescents. / Miguel-Berges, María L.; Reilly, John J.; Moreno Aznar, Luis A.; Jiménez Pavón, David.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 12.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Reilly, John J.

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AU - Jiménez Pavón, David

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