Assessing the impact of DFIG synthetic inertia provision on power system small-signal stability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Synthetic inertia provision through the control of doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbines is an effective means of providing frequency support to the wider electrical network. There are numerous control topologies to achieve this, many of which work by making modifications to the DFIG power controller and introducing additional loops to relate active power to electrical frequency. How these many controller designs compare to one-another in terms of their contribution to frequency response is a much studied topic, but perhaps less studied is their effect on the small-signal stability of the system. The concept of small-signal stability in the context of a power system is the ability to maintain synchronism when subjected to small disturbances, such as those associated with a change in load or a loss of generation. Amendments made to the control system of a large-scale wind farm will inevitably have an effect on the system as a whole, and by making a DFIG wind turbine behave more like a synchronous generator, which synthetic inertia provision does, may incur consequences relating to electromechanical oscillations between generating units. This work compares the implications of two prominent synthetic inertia controllers of varying complexity and their effect on small-signal stability. Eigenvalue analysis is conducted to highlight the key information relating to electromechanical modes between generators for the two control strategies, with a focus on how these affect the damping ratios. It is shown that as the synthetic inertia controller becomes both more complex and more effective, the damping ratio of the electromechanical modes is reduced, signifying a decreased system stability.

LanguageEnglish
Article number3440
Number of pages15
JournalEnergies
Volume12
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Asynchronous generators
Power System
Inertia
Proof by induction
Generator
Controllers
Wind turbines
Wind Turbine
Controller
Damping
Synchronous generators
Topology Control
Eigenvalue Analysis
Electrical Networks
System stability
Farms
Frequency response
Frequency Response
Synchronization
Controller Design

Keywords

  • DFIG
  • small-signal stability
  • synthetic inertia

Cite this

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abstract = "Synthetic inertia provision through the control of doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbines is an effective means of providing frequency support to the wider electrical network. There are numerous control topologies to achieve this, many of which work by making modifications to the DFIG power controller and introducing additional loops to relate active power to electrical frequency. How these many controller designs compare to one-another in terms of their contribution to frequency response is a much studied topic, but perhaps less studied is their effect on the small-signal stability of the system. The concept of small-signal stability in the context of a power system is the ability to maintain synchronism when subjected to small disturbances, such as those associated with a change in load or a loss of generation. Amendments made to the control system of a large-scale wind farm will inevitably have an effect on the system as a whole, and by making a DFIG wind turbine behave more like a synchronous generator, which synthetic inertia provision does, may incur consequences relating to electromechanical oscillations between generating units. This work compares the implications of two prominent synthetic inertia controllers of varying complexity and their effect on small-signal stability. Eigenvalue analysis is conducted to highlight the key information relating to electromechanical modes between generators for the two control strategies, with a focus on how these affect the damping ratios. It is shown that as the synthetic inertia controller becomes both more complex and more effective, the damping ratio of the electromechanical modes is reduced, signifying a decreased system stability.",
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Assessing the impact of DFIG synthetic inertia provision on power system small-signal stability. / Lucas, Edgar; Campos-Gaona, David; Anaya-Lara, Olimpo.

In: Energies, Vol. 12, No. 18, 3440, 06.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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