Application of ultrasound to monitor in vivo residual bone movement within transtibial prosthetic sockets

Niels Jonkergouw, Maarten R. Prins, Daniël Donse, Peter van der Wurff, Jaap H. van Dieën, Arjan Buis, Han Houdijk

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Abstract

Transtibial prosthetic users do often struggle to achieve an optimal prosthetic fit, leading to residual limb pain and stump-socket instability. Prosthetists face challenges in objectively assessing the impact of prosthetic adjustments on residual limb loading. Understanding the mechanical behaviour of the pseudo-joint formed by the residual bone and prosthesis may facilitate prosthetic adjustments and achieving optimal fit. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using B-mode ultrasound to monitor in vivo residual bone movement within a transtibial prosthetic socket during different stepping tasks. Five transtibial prosthesis users participated, and ultrasound images were captured using a Samsung HM70A system during five dynamic conditions. Bone movement relative to the socket was quantified by tracking the bone contour using Adobe After-Effect. During the study a methodological adjustment was made to improve data quality, and the first two participants were excluded from analysis. The remaining three participants exhibited consistent range of motion, with a signal to noise ratio ranging from 1.12 to 2.59. Medial–lateral and anterior–posterior absolute range of motion varied between 0.03 to 0.88 cm and 0.14 to 0.87 cm, respectively. This study demonstrated that it is feasible to use B-mode ultrasound to monitor in vivo residual bone movement inside an intact prosthetic socket during stepping tasks.
Original languageEnglish
Article number9725
Number of pages11
JournalScientific Reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • ultra sound
  • prosthetics
  • bone movement

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