Anticipatory socialisation of graduates into professions through recruitment and selection

Dora Scholarios, Cliff Lockyer, Heather Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recruitment and selection experiences are part of a process of pre-entry organisational socialisation, also known as anticipatory socialisation. Graduates are susceptible to such effects as their socialisation through exposure to professional employers begins during training. Employers' practices are thought to contribute to the formation of realistic career expectations and the initial psychological contract between graduates and employers. The present study found that students in traditional professions reported greater exposure to employers than students in an emerging profession through work activities, more proactive engagement in recruitment events, and more extensive experience of selection processes at similar stages of study. Greater activity, in turn, was related to career expectations, including varying levels of commitment to and interest in the profession and career clarity.
LanguageEnglish
Pages182-197
Number of pages15
JournalCareer Development International
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Socialisation
employer
career expectation
profession
graduate
experience
student
career
commitment
Employers
Socialization
Recruitment and selection
event
Career expectations

Keywords

  • career development
  • graduates
  • organisational culture
  • recruitment
  • human resource management

Cite this

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Anticipatory socialisation of graduates into professions through recruitment and selection. / Scholarios, Dora; Lockyer, Cliff; Johnson, Heather.

In: Career Development International, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2003, p. 182-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lockyer, Cliff

AU - Johnson, Heather

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