Analyzing speech movement variability from audio recordings

Frits Van Brenk, Anja Lowit

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

58 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Producing fluent and intelligible speech involves quick, precise and coordinated movements of articulators. Developmental and acquired speech motor disorders often result in an instable gestural organization of speech movements, and thus more variable speech performance. In addition, research suggest that a number of environmental factors can influence articulatory movements, including speech rate modifications, linguistic and cognitive complexity of the speech task and concurrent motor tasks. The possible interaction of internal and external factors that influence speech motor control might give more insight in the nature of different speech disorders. The spatiotemporal index (STI) (Smith et al., 1995) and Functional Data Analysis (FDA) (Ramsay et al., 1996) are techniques that have been shown to be successful in investigating variability of kinematic movements obtained by lip displacement tracking, but may also be applied to other dimensions of speech, including amplitude envelopes and pitch and formant tracks. This pilot study presents some first results on STI and FDA variability measures applied to audio recordings of young, healthy adults. The study aims to investigate whether variability measures obtained from acoustic data reflect those from kinematic data.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2010
EventConference on Cognitive and Physical Models of Speech Production, Speech Perception and Production-Perception Interaction - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 27 Sep 20101 Oct 2010

Conference

ConferenceConference on Cognitive and Physical Models of Speech Production, Speech Perception and Production-Perception Interaction
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period27/09/101/10/10

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • fluent speech
  • speech motor disorders
  • speech rate

Cite this

Van Brenk, F., & Lowit, A. (2010). Analyzing speech movement variability from audio recordings. Poster session presented at Conference on Cognitive and Physical Models of Speech Production, Speech Perception and Production-Perception Interaction, Berlin, Germany.