An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria

Abimbola Oladimeji Famuyiwa, Christine Davidson

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Lagos is one of the fastest-growing metropolises in the world, with a population of 21 million, increasing by 600,000 or 2.8% annually. The impact of this rapid development and industrialisation on levels of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the city’s soils is of concern, and requires investigation, because of possible effects on human health.
Soil samples were collected from different land-use types and socioeconomic areas in Lagos State and returned to the UK. They were dried, sieved, and subjected to microwave-assisted aqua regia digestion, the revised BCR sequential extraction, and the simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). The analytes Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in soil extracts and digests by ICP-MS.
Mean pseudototal PTE concentrations at locations remote from point sources of pollution were generally low, but soils taken from locations close to industrial activities such as foundries, dumpsites, and e-waste recycling sites were often highly contaminated. Sequential extraction indicated that Cr, Fe and Ni were mainly of geogenic origin, whilst the ‘urban metals’ Cu, Pb and Zn were in more labile forms of greater environmental concern. The SBET indicated that PTE uptake by a hypothetical 10 kg child with pica tendencies (consuming 10 g of soil per day) would greatly exceed tolerable daily intake (TDI) values for Cu, Pb and Zn at many locations.
The study demonstrated that, although general urban background PTE levels in Lagos soils are currently low, there is an urgent need for introduction of appropriate environmental and human health protection legislation.

Conference

ConferenceBNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period4/07/166/07/16

Fingerprint

Poisons
Soils
Health
Foundries
Land use
Recycling
Pollution
Metals
Microwaves

Keywords

  • toxic elements
  • urban soils
  • Nigeria

Cite this

Famuyiwa, A. O., & Davidson, C. (Accepted/In press). An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria. Abstract from BNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
Famuyiwa, Abimbola Oladimeji ; Davidson, Christine. / An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria. Abstract from BNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
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abstract = "Lagos is one of the fastest-growing metropolises in the world, with a population of 21 million, increasing by 600,000 or 2.8{\%} annually. The impact of this rapid development and industrialisation on levels of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the city’s soils is of concern, and requires investigation, because of possible effects on human health.Soil samples were collected from different land-use types and socioeconomic areas in Lagos State and returned to the UK. They were dried, sieved, and subjected to microwave-assisted aqua regia digestion, the revised BCR sequential extraction, and the simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). The analytes Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in soil extracts and digests by ICP-MS.Mean pseudototal PTE concentrations at locations remote from point sources of pollution were generally low, but soils taken from locations close to industrial activities such as foundries, dumpsites, and e-waste recycling sites were often highly contaminated. Sequential extraction indicated that Cr, Fe and Ni were mainly of geogenic origin, whilst the ‘urban metals’ Cu, Pb and Zn were in more labile forms of greater environmental concern. The SBET indicated that PTE uptake by a hypothetical 10 kg child with pica tendencies (consuming 10 g of soil per day) would greatly exceed tolerable daily intake (TDI) values for Cu, Pb and Zn at many locations. The study demonstrated that, although general urban background PTE levels in Lagos soils are currently low, there is an urgent need for introduction of appropriate environmental and human health protection legislation.",
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author = "Famuyiwa, {Abimbola Oladimeji} and Christine Davidson",
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Famuyiwa, AO & Davidson, C 2016, 'An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria' BNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium, Liverpool, United Kingdom, 4/07/16 - 6/07/16, .

An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria. / Famuyiwa, Abimbola Oladimeji; Davidson, Christine.

2016. Abstract from BNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria

AU - Famuyiwa, Abimbola Oladimeji

AU - Davidson, Christine

PY - 2016/4/28

Y1 - 2016/4/28

N2 - Lagos is one of the fastest-growing metropolises in the world, with a population of 21 million, increasing by 600,000 or 2.8% annually. The impact of this rapid development and industrialisation on levels of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the city’s soils is of concern, and requires investigation, because of possible effects on human health.Soil samples were collected from different land-use types and socioeconomic areas in Lagos State and returned to the UK. They were dried, sieved, and subjected to microwave-assisted aqua regia digestion, the revised BCR sequential extraction, and the simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). The analytes Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in soil extracts and digests by ICP-MS.Mean pseudototal PTE concentrations at locations remote from point sources of pollution were generally low, but soils taken from locations close to industrial activities such as foundries, dumpsites, and e-waste recycling sites were often highly contaminated. Sequential extraction indicated that Cr, Fe and Ni were mainly of geogenic origin, whilst the ‘urban metals’ Cu, Pb and Zn were in more labile forms of greater environmental concern. The SBET indicated that PTE uptake by a hypothetical 10 kg child with pica tendencies (consuming 10 g of soil per day) would greatly exceed tolerable daily intake (TDI) values for Cu, Pb and Zn at many locations. The study demonstrated that, although general urban background PTE levels in Lagos soils are currently low, there is an urgent need for introduction of appropriate environmental and human health protection legislation.

AB - Lagos is one of the fastest-growing metropolises in the world, with a population of 21 million, increasing by 600,000 or 2.8% annually. The impact of this rapid development and industrialisation on levels of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the city’s soils is of concern, and requires investigation, because of possible effects on human health.Soil samples were collected from different land-use types and socioeconomic areas in Lagos State and returned to the UK. They were dried, sieved, and subjected to microwave-assisted aqua regia digestion, the revised BCR sequential extraction, and the simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). The analytes Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in soil extracts and digests by ICP-MS.Mean pseudototal PTE concentrations at locations remote from point sources of pollution were generally low, but soils taken from locations close to industrial activities such as foundries, dumpsites, and e-waste recycling sites were often highly contaminated. Sequential extraction indicated that Cr, Fe and Ni were mainly of geogenic origin, whilst the ‘urban metals’ Cu, Pb and Zn were in more labile forms of greater environmental concern. The SBET indicated that PTE uptake by a hypothetical 10 kg child with pica tendencies (consuming 10 g of soil per day) would greatly exceed tolerable daily intake (TDI) values for Cu, Pb and Zn at many locations. The study demonstrated that, although general urban background PTE levels in Lagos soils are currently low, there is an urgent need for introduction of appropriate environmental and human health protection legislation.

KW - toxic elements

KW - urban soils

KW - Nigeria

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Famuyiwa AO, Davidson C. An investigation of the distribution, mobility and bioaccessibility of potentially toxic elements in urban soils of Lagos, Nigeria. 2016. Abstract from BNASS 2016: The 18th Biennial National Atomic Spectroscopy Symposium, Liverpool, United Kingdom.