An investigation of factors impacting on mainstream teachers' beliefs about teaching students with learning difficulties

Lisa Woolfson, Katy Brady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between teacher experience, further professional development training, and beliefs and attributions about teaching students with additional learning support needs was studied in a sample of 199 mainstream general class primary school teachers. Using multiple regression, it was found that none of the teacher experience or professional training variables were significant predictors of locus of causality, stability, or controllability attributions, or of teacher self-efficacy with students with difficulties in learning. Self-efficacy, however, was a positive predictor of attributions, and sympathy a negative predictor. Multivariate analysis of variance found no relationship between teacher experience, further professional development training, and dependent outcome variables: self-efficacy with learning difficulties, coping with learning difficulties, interactions with people with disabilities, or general optimism. Implications for continued professional development are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-238
Number of pages17
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Keywords

  • inclusive education
  • learning difficulties
  • professional development
  • self-efficacy
  • locus of control

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