An input-output based alternative to 'ecological footprints' for tracking pollution generation in a small open economy

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

The usefulness, rigour and consistency of Input-Output (IO) as an accounting framework is well known. However, there is concern over the appropriateness of the standard IO attribution approach, particularly when applied to environmental issues (Bicknell et al. 1998). It is often argued that the source and responsibility for pollution should be located in human private or public consumption. An example is the "ecological footprint" approach of Wackernagel and Rees (1996). However, in the standard IO procedure, the pollution attributed to consumption, particularly private consumption, can be small or even zero. Here we attempt to retain the consumption-orientation of the "ecological footprint" method within an IO framework by implementing a neo-classical linear attribution system (NCLAS) which endogenises trade flows. We argue that this approach has practical and conceptual advantages over the "ecological footprint". The NCLAS method is then applied to the small, open economy of Jersey.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow, Scotland
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages49
Volume04-04
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

ecological footprint
pollution
trade flow
environmental issue
consumption
economy
Pollution
Small open economy
Ecological footprint
Attribution
method
Private consumption

Keywords

  • environmental input-output
  • ecological footprint
  • pollution multipliers
  • Jersey

Cite this

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abstract = "The usefulness, rigour and consistency of Input-Output (IO) as an accounting framework is well known. However, there is concern over the appropriateness of the standard IO attribution approach, particularly when applied to environmental issues (Bicknell et al. 1998). It is often argued that the source and responsibility for pollution should be located in human private or public consumption. An example is the {"}ecological footprint{"} approach of Wackernagel and Rees (1996). However, in the standard IO procedure, the pollution attributed to consumption, particularly private consumption, can be small or even zero. Here we attempt to retain the consumption-orientation of the {"}ecological footprint{"} method within an IO framework by implementing a neo-classical linear attribution system (NCLAS) which endogenises trade flows. We argue that this approach has practical and conceptual advantages over the {"}ecological footprint{"}. The NCLAS method is then applied to the small, open economy of Jersey.",
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AU - McGregor, Peter G.

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N2 - The usefulness, rigour and consistency of Input-Output (IO) as an accounting framework is well known. However, there is concern over the appropriateness of the standard IO attribution approach, particularly when applied to environmental issues (Bicknell et al. 1998). It is often argued that the source and responsibility for pollution should be located in human private or public consumption. An example is the "ecological footprint" approach of Wackernagel and Rees (1996). However, in the standard IO procedure, the pollution attributed to consumption, particularly private consumption, can be small or even zero. Here we attempt to retain the consumption-orientation of the "ecological footprint" method within an IO framework by implementing a neo-classical linear attribution system (NCLAS) which endogenises trade flows. We argue that this approach has practical and conceptual advantages over the "ecological footprint". The NCLAS method is then applied to the small, open economy of Jersey.

AB - The usefulness, rigour and consistency of Input-Output (IO) as an accounting framework is well known. However, there is concern over the appropriateness of the standard IO attribution approach, particularly when applied to environmental issues (Bicknell et al. 1998). It is often argued that the source and responsibility for pollution should be located in human private or public consumption. An example is the "ecological footprint" approach of Wackernagel and Rees (1996). However, in the standard IO procedure, the pollution attributed to consumption, particularly private consumption, can be small or even zero. Here we attempt to retain the consumption-orientation of the "ecological footprint" method within an IO framework by implementing a neo-classical linear attribution system (NCLAS) which endogenises trade flows. We argue that this approach has practical and conceptual advantages over the "ecological footprint". The NCLAS method is then applied to the small, open economy of Jersey.

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KW - ecological footprint

KW - pollution multipliers

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BT - An input-output based alternative to 'ecological footprints' for tracking pollution generation in a small open economy

PB - University of Strathclyde

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