An application of the prototype willingness model to drivers' speeding behaviour

Mark A. Elliott, Rebecca McCartan, Sarah E. Brewster, Dionne Coyle, Lindsey Emerson, Kayleigh Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
120 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We tested the prototype willingness model (PWM). The participants (N=198) completed online questionnaire measures of PWM constructs (time 1) and subsequent speeding behaviour (time 2). Path analyses showed that the PWM accounted for 89% of the variance in subsequent (self-reported) speeding behaviour. This significantly exceeded the variance accounted for by the theory of planned behaviour. In line with the PWM, both behavioural intention and behavioural willingness had direct effects on behaviour. Behavioural willingness had a significantly larger effect. Attitude and subjective norm both had indirect effects on behaviour through both behavioural intention and behavioural willingness. Prototype (similarity) perceptions had indirect effects on behaviour through behavioural willingness only. The findings support the notion that driving is governed by reactive decision-making (willingness), underpinned by prototype perceptions, attitudes and subjective norms, to a greater extent than it is deliberative decision-making (intentions), underpinned by attitudes and subjective norms. The implications for safety interventions are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-747
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume47
Early online date20 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2017

Fingerprint

Decision Making
Willingness
Prototype
Safety
Subjective norm
Behavioral intention
Indirect effects
Decision making
Surveys and Questionnaires
Theory of planned behavior
Direct effect
Questionnaire

Keywords

  • prototype willingness model
  • rationale decision-making
  • reactive decision-making
  • speeding
  • driving

Cite this

Elliott, Mark A. ; McCartan, Rebecca ; Brewster, Sarah E. ; Coyle, Dionne ; Emerson, Lindsey ; Gibson, Kayleigh. / An application of the prototype willingness model to drivers' speeding behaviour. In: European Journal of Social Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 47. pp. 735-747.
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An application of the prototype willingness model to drivers' speeding behaviour. / Elliott, Mark A.; McCartan, Rebecca; Brewster, Sarah E.; Coyle, Dionne; Emerson, Lindsey; Gibson, Kayleigh.

In: European Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 47, 31.10.2017, p. 735-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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