Allocating spectrum: towards a commons future

Mohamed El-Moghazi, Jason Whalley, James Irvine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spectrum divide is a consequence of the current spectrum management framework which is locked into a paradigm that is based on assigning spectrum exclusively to a number of operators. This regulatory gridlock is due to resistance from current institutional framework, decision making political economy, and misconception of commons. Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) applications, International Telecommunication Union (ITU) primary allocation for mobile service in the 5 GHz for the implementation of WLAN applications, and operation of Cognitive Radio Systems (CRS) in the TV white spaces have initiated changes to the current framework. The driving forces for CRS deployment are ITU indirect support, pressure on regulators to face the growth in data demand, and benefits to the industry. On the other hand, the undermining forces are the ITU concerns, regulators' constrains, broadcasting deployment, and manufacturing issues. This paper argues that the CRS trigger has initiated a new wave of changes within the current spectrum management framework towards spectrum commons where DSA is enabled in other services' spectrum bands rather than broadcasting. The new spectrum management paradigm would accommodate a new kind of secondary operators that deploy CRS to dynamically access the licensees' spectrum. However, it would be difficult for this new paradigm to evolve towards the spectrum commons paradigm. This is due to the structure of the current spectrum management framework which is in favour of regulators and operators.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN)
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781467344470
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2012
EventDySPAN - Washington DC, United States
Duration: 16 Oct 201219 Oct 2012

Conference

ConferenceDySPAN
CountryUnited States
CityWashington DC
Period16/10/1219/10/12

Fingerprint

Radio systems
Cognitive radio
Telecommunication
Broadcasting
Medical applications
Wireless local area networks (WLAN)
Decision making
Industry

Keywords

  • TV
  • white spaces
  • broadcasting
  • mobile communication
  • regulators
  • resource management
  • television
  • spectrum
  • commons future

Cite this

El-Moghazi, M., Whalley, J., & Irvine, J. (2012). Allocating spectrum: towards a commons future. In 2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN) IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/DYSPAN.2012.6478110
El-Moghazi, Mohamed ; Whalley, Jason ; Irvine, James. / Allocating spectrum : towards a commons future. 2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN) . IEEE, 2012.
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El-Moghazi, M, Whalley, J & Irvine, J 2012, Allocating spectrum: towards a commons future. in 2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN) . IEEE, DySPAN, Washington DC, United States, 16/10/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/DYSPAN.2012.6478110

Allocating spectrum : towards a commons future. / El-Moghazi, Mohamed; Whalley, Jason; Irvine, James.

2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN) . IEEE, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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El-Moghazi M, Whalley J, Irvine J. Allocating spectrum: towards a commons future. In 2012 IEEE international symposium on dynamic spectrum access networks (DYSPAN) . IEEE. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1109/DYSPAN.2012.6478110