All-optical processing in switching networks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the backbone of today’s high performance networks, optical fibers provide enormous point-to-point communications capacity. With the deployment of DWDM equipment, aggregate throughputs on the order of a few Tbps per fiber are being achieved [1]. However, despite the recent success of fiber optics, it has so far been used primarily as a low loss, high bandwidth replacement to electrical cable in point-to-point transmission links. In these systems, optical signals are usually converted to the electrical domain at intermediate nodes in order to perform switching and signal processing. For example, in the Internet, electronic switches are used to route packets to their destinations. However, in this approach, the maximum serial line rate is limited by the bandwidth of electronics, which is considerably less than the bandwidth available in optical fiber. In effect, an “electronic bottleneck” is created in the system. This article summarizes the research efforts at Princeton University towards the development of network nodes capable of all-optical signal processing and routing.
LanguageEnglish
JournalIEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Switching networks
Bandwidth
Optical fibers
Processing
Optical signal processing
Dense wavelength division multiplexing
Network performance
Optical systems
Fiber optics
Signal processing
Cables
Electronic equipment
Switches
Throughput
Internet
Fibers
Communication

Keywords

  • optics
  • switching networks
  • optical processing

Cite this

@article{acf847991bd94397930e7eab6cc2e0ba,
title = "All-optical processing in switching networks",
abstract = "In the backbone of today’s high performance networks, optical fibers provide enormous point-to-point communications capacity. With the deployment of DWDM equipment, aggregate throughputs on the order of a few Tbps per fiber are being achieved [1]. However, despite the recent success of fiber optics, it has so far been used primarily as a low loss, high bandwidth replacement to electrical cable in point-to-point transmission links. In these systems, optical signals are usually converted to the electrical domain at intermediate nodes in order to perform switching and signal processing. For example, in the Internet, electronic switches are used to route packets to their destinations. However, in this approach, the maximum serial line rate is limited by the bandwidth of electronics, which is considerably less than the bandwidth available in optical fiber. In effect, an “electronic bottleneck” is created in the system. This article summarizes the research efforts at Princeton University towards the development of network nodes capable of all-optical signal processing and routing.",
keywords = "optics, switching networks , optical processing",
author = "I. Glesk",
year = "2002",
language = "English",
journal = "IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting",
issn = "1092-8081",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - All-optical processing in switching networks

AU - Glesk, I.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - In the backbone of today’s high performance networks, optical fibers provide enormous point-to-point communications capacity. With the deployment of DWDM equipment, aggregate throughputs on the order of a few Tbps per fiber are being achieved [1]. However, despite the recent success of fiber optics, it has so far been used primarily as a low loss, high bandwidth replacement to electrical cable in point-to-point transmission links. In these systems, optical signals are usually converted to the electrical domain at intermediate nodes in order to perform switching and signal processing. For example, in the Internet, electronic switches are used to route packets to their destinations. However, in this approach, the maximum serial line rate is limited by the bandwidth of electronics, which is considerably less than the bandwidth available in optical fiber. In effect, an “electronic bottleneck” is created in the system. This article summarizes the research efforts at Princeton University towards the development of network nodes capable of all-optical signal processing and routing.

AB - In the backbone of today’s high performance networks, optical fibers provide enormous point-to-point communications capacity. With the deployment of DWDM equipment, aggregate throughputs on the order of a few Tbps per fiber are being achieved [1]. However, despite the recent success of fiber optics, it has so far been used primarily as a low loss, high bandwidth replacement to electrical cable in point-to-point transmission links. In these systems, optical signals are usually converted to the electrical domain at intermediate nodes in order to perform switching and signal processing. For example, in the Internet, electronic switches are used to route packets to their destinations. However, in this approach, the maximum serial line rate is limited by the bandwidth of electronics, which is considerably less than the bandwidth available in optical fiber. In effect, an “electronic bottleneck” is created in the system. This article summarizes the research efforts at Princeton University towards the development of network nodes capable of all-optical signal processing and routing.

KW - optics

KW - switching networks

KW - optical processing

UR - http://photonicssociety.org/newsletters/oct02/prucnal.html

M3 - Article

JO - IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting

T2 - IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting

JF - IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting

SN - 1092-8081

ER -