Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The role of international private law is often regarded as being ‘derived from a desire to do justice’ for parties involved in cross-border disputes. The onset of electronic commerce and the increasing prevalence of electronic contracts pose new challenges for international private law. Entering into a contract by electronic means enables parties who are domiciled (or have a place of business) in different jurisdictions to use the Internet or e-mail for the purchase and sale of goods and services or a combination of both. Whilst issues of privacy and security are undoubtedly of extreme importance to consumers when conducting their transactions online, other aspects of the electronic consumer contract are just as important. From an international private law perspective, rules of jurisdiction and the law to be applied to online consumer contracts have been the subject of considerable debate. International private law and electronic commerce In a paper published in 1997, Vaughan Black asserted that international private law need only be considered in one-off cases when cross-border matters arise. Given today’s globalisation of markets and finance, combined with increased co-operation between governments internationally, cross-border cases are by no means exceptional. Rules and principles of international private law need to be considered more often, especially if parties to a contract have not agreed which law is to apply to that contract, or if aspects of their agreement are in dispute.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice
EditorsC E F Rickett, Thomas G W Telfer
Place of PublicationCambridge
Pages359-383
Number of pages25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Mar 2003

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private law
international law
electronics
electronic commerce
jurisdiction
Law
e-mail
sale
transaction
purchase
privacy
finance
justice
globalization
Internet
market

Keywords

  • private law
  • electronic consumer contracts
  • international private law

Cite this

Gillies, L. E. (2003). Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts. In C. E. F. Rickett, & T. G. W. Telfer (Eds.), International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice (pp. 359-383). Cambridge. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511494833.016
Gillies, Lorna E. / Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts. International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice. editor / C E F Rickett ; Thomas G W Telfer. Cambridge, 2003. pp. 359-383
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Gillies, LE 2003, Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts. in CEF Rickett & TGW Telfer (eds), International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice. Cambridge, pp. 359-383. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511494833.016

Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts. / Gillies, Lorna E.

International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice. ed. / C E F Rickett; Thomas G W Telfer. Cambridge, 2003. p. 359-383.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Gillies LE. Adapting international private law rules for electronic consumer contracts. In Rickett CEF, Telfer TGW, editors, International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice. Cambridge. 2003. p. 359-383 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511494833.016