Active and passive smoking and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis

Alina Macacu, Philippe Autier, Mathieu Boniol, Peter Boyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Studies on active and passive tobacco smoking and breast cancer have found inconsistent results. A meta-analysis of observational studies on tobacco smoking and breast cancer occurrence was conducted based on systematic searches for studies with retrospective (case-control) and prospective (cohort) designs. Eligible studies were identified, and relative risk measurements were extracted for active and passive tobacco exposures. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to compute summary relative risks (SRR). Heterogeneity of results between studies was evaluated using the (I (2)) statistics. For ever active smoking, in 27 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.10 (95 % CI [1.09-1.12]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 0 %). In 44 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.08 (95 % CI [1.02-1.14]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 59 %). SRRs for current active smoking were 1.13 (95 % CI [1.09-1.17]) in 27 prospective studies and 1.08 (95 % CI [0.97-1.20]) in 22 retrospective studies. The results were stable across different subgroup analyses, notably pre/post-menopause, alcohol consumption adjustments, including/excluding passive smokers from the referent group. For ever passive smoking, in 11 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.07 (95 % CI [1.02-1.13]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 1 %). In 20 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.30 (95 % CI [1.10-1.54]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 74 %). Too few prospective studies were available for meaningful subgroup analyses. There is consistent evidence for a moderate increase in the risk of breast cancer in women who smoke tobacco. The evidence for a moderate increase in risk with passive smoking is more substantial than a few years ago.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-224
Number of pages12
JournalBreast cancer research and treatment
Volume154
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Meta-Analysis
Breast Neoplasms
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Tobacco
Premenopause
Postmenopause
Social Adjustment
Smoke
Alcohol Drinking
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • environmental tobacco smoke
  • smoking
  • meta analysis
  • tobacco smoke

Cite this

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abstract = "Studies on active and passive tobacco smoking and breast cancer have found inconsistent results. A meta-analysis of observational studies on tobacco smoking and breast cancer occurrence was conducted based on systematic searches for studies with retrospective (case-control) and prospective (cohort) designs. Eligible studies were identified, and relative risk measurements were extracted for active and passive tobacco exposures. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to compute summary relative risks (SRR). Heterogeneity of results between studies was evaluated using the (I (2)) statistics. For ever active smoking, in 27 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.10 (95 {\%} CI [1.09-1.12]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 0 {\%}). In 44 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.08 (95 {\%} CI [1.02-1.14]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 59 {\%}). SRRs for current active smoking were 1.13 (95 {\%} CI [1.09-1.17]) in 27 prospective studies and 1.08 (95 {\%} CI [0.97-1.20]) in 22 retrospective studies. The results were stable across different subgroup analyses, notably pre/post-menopause, alcohol consumption adjustments, including/excluding passive smokers from the referent group. For ever passive smoking, in 11 prospective studies, the SRR for breast cancer was 1.07 (95 {\%} CI [1.02-1.13]) with no heterogeneity (I (2) = 1 {\%}). In 20 retrospective studies, the SRR was 1.30 (95 {\%} CI [1.10-1.54]) with high heterogeneity (I (2) = 74 {\%}). Too few prospective studies were available for meaningful subgroup analyses. There is consistent evidence for a moderate increase in the risk of breast cancer in women who smoke tobacco. The evidence for a moderate increase in risk with passive smoking is more substantial than a few years ago.",
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Active and passive smoking and risk of breast cancer : a meta-analysis. / Macacu, Alina; Autier, Philippe; Boniol, Mathieu; Boyle, Peter.

In: Breast cancer research and treatment, Vol. 154, No. 2, 06.11.2015, p. 213-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Active and passive smoking and risk of breast cancer

T2 - a meta-analysis

AU - Macacu, Alina

AU - Autier, Philippe

AU - Boniol, Mathieu

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KW - environmental tobacco smoke

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