Acreemagnosia (loss of financial knowledge): a symptom of functional and cognitive loss in frail elderly

Irina Kozlova, Mario A. Parra, Sergio Della Sala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability to maintain one's own finances is a complex function that relies on several cognitive constructs. Its decline is argued to be an early symptom of dementia and a strong predictor of future cognitive decline (Marson et al., 2000). The impairment in financial abilities and the lack of awareness of such deficits carry considerable social and legal impact and are among the primary factors precluding independent life and requiring legal assistance. Despite its relevance, little attention has been paid to this common symptom. To highlight the specificity of the symptom, we suggest a term to define it: Acreemagnosia, from the Ancient Greek ἀ‐ (a‐, ‘lack of’), χρήμα (creema, ‘money’) and γνωσιακή (gnôsis, ‘knowledge’).
LanguageEnglish
Pages434-435
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number2
Early online date18 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2018

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Frail Elderly
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Aptitude
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cognitive decline
  • dementia

Cite this

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Acreemagnosia (loss of financial knowledge) : a symptom of functional and cognitive loss in frail elderly. / Kozlova, Irina; Parra, Mario A.; Della Sala, Sergio.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 33, No. 2, 28.02.2018, p. 434-435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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