Accessing social work training in Scotland from sub-degree level further education

Graham Connelly, Mono Chakrabarti

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Scotland is a nation of some 5 million people, historically distinct from the other countries which form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Since the union of the English and Welsh Parliament with the Scottish Parliament in 1707, Scotland has been an integral part of Britain (all of the opposition parties currently favour some form of devolved government in Scotland). However, the key institutions of law, education and the Church of Scotland were already well-established and secured privileged status in the Act of Union. As a result, the Scottish education system has many different features from the system operating elsewhere in the UK, and one of these - a more unified approach to the curriculum in schools and further education (community colleges) - has had some important implications for development in student access to social work training in universities and other higher education institutions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)281-289
    Number of pages9
    JournalEuropean Journal of Education
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1997

    Fingerprint

    further education
    social work
    parliament
    school education
    education system
    education
    opposition
    church
    act
    curriculum
    Law
    university
    community
    student

    Keywords

    • Scotland
    • access to higher education
    • social work
    • further eduation

    Cite this

    @article{fff75c9eaa3f4a929786f580ead086a4,
    title = "Accessing social work training in Scotland from sub-degree level further education",
    abstract = "Scotland is a nation of some 5 million people, historically distinct from the other countries which form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Since the union of the English and Welsh Parliament with the Scottish Parliament in 1707, Scotland has been an integral part of Britain (all of the opposition parties currently favour some form of devolved government in Scotland). However, the key institutions of law, education and the Church of Scotland were already well-established and secured privileged status in the Act of Union. As a result, the Scottish education system has many different features from the system operating elsewhere in the UK, and one of these - a more unified approach to the curriculum in schools and further education (community colleges) - has had some important implications for development in student access to social work training in universities and other higher education institutions.",
    keywords = "Scotland, access to higher education, social work, further eduation",
    author = "Graham Connelly and Mono Chakrabarti",
    year = "1997",
    month = "9",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "281--289",
    journal = "European Journal of Education",
    issn = "0141-8211",
    number = "3",

    }

    Accessing social work training in Scotland from sub-degree level further education. / Connelly, Graham; Chakrabarti, Mono.

    In: European Journal of Education, Vol. 32, No. 3, 09.1997, p. 281-289.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Accessing social work training in Scotland from sub-degree level further education

    AU - Connelly, Graham

    AU - Chakrabarti, Mono

    PY - 1997/9

    Y1 - 1997/9

    N2 - Scotland is a nation of some 5 million people, historically distinct from the other countries which form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Since the union of the English and Welsh Parliament with the Scottish Parliament in 1707, Scotland has been an integral part of Britain (all of the opposition parties currently favour some form of devolved government in Scotland). However, the key institutions of law, education and the Church of Scotland were already well-established and secured privileged status in the Act of Union. As a result, the Scottish education system has many different features from the system operating elsewhere in the UK, and one of these - a more unified approach to the curriculum in schools and further education (community colleges) - has had some important implications for development in student access to social work training in universities and other higher education institutions.

    AB - Scotland is a nation of some 5 million people, historically distinct from the other countries which form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Since the union of the English and Welsh Parliament with the Scottish Parliament in 1707, Scotland has been an integral part of Britain (all of the opposition parties currently favour some form of devolved government in Scotland). However, the key institutions of law, education and the Church of Scotland were already well-established and secured privileged status in the Act of Union. As a result, the Scottish education system has many different features from the system operating elsewhere in the UK, and one of these - a more unified approach to the curriculum in schools and further education (community colleges) - has had some important implications for development in student access to social work training in universities and other higher education institutions.

    KW - Scotland

    KW - access to higher education

    KW - social work

    KW - further eduation

    UR - http://www.jstor.org/stable/1503577 .

    M3 - Article

    VL - 32

    SP - 281

    EP - 289

    JO - European Journal of Education

    JF - European Journal of Education

    SN - 0141-8211

    IS - 3

    ER -