Accessing a 'very, very secret garden': exploring children's and young people's literacy practices using participatory research methods

Margarita Calderón López, Virginie Theriault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite the wealth of publications on children’s and young people’s participation in research, the connections between participatory research methods (PRM) and literacy studies remain unclear. The aim of this paper is to understand why it is particularly pertinent to use PRM in literacy studies (particularly New Literacy Studies). In order to capture the complexity and plurality of these methods, we discuss two studies, one conducted with children in Chile and the other with young people in Québec (Canada). We argue that by using PRM, researchers can support participants in the appropriation of an alternative and potentially empowering view of literacy.
LanguageEnglish
Pages39-54
Number of pages16
JournalLanguage and Literacy
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Oct 2017

Fingerprint

research method
literacy
Chile
Canada
participation
Literacy
Participatory Research
Secret Garden
Research Methods
Literacy Practices
Participation
Quebec
New Literacy Studies
Wealth
Appropriation
Plurality

Keywords

  • participatory research methods
  • new literacy studies
  • children
  • young people
  • voice in research

Cite this

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Accessing a 'very, very secret garden' : exploring children's and young people's literacy practices using participatory research methods. / Calderón López, Margarita; Theriault, Virginie.

In: Language and Literacy, Vol. 19, No. 4, 03.10.2017, p. 39-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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