A wind-powered seawater reverse-osmosis system without batteries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of small-scale stand-alone desalination systems is important to communities on islands and in isolated inland areas. In such places, electricity supplies are often expensive and unreliable, while the wind resource is abundant. The system presented here comprises a 2.2 kW wind turbine generator powering a variable-flow Reverse osmosis (RO) desalination unit. It is highly efficient, rugged, built with off-the-shelf components and suitable for use in remote areas. Operation at variable-flow allows the uncertainty and variability of the wind to be accommodated without need of energy storage. Batteries, which are common in stand-alone systems, are avoided and water production is dependent on the instantaneous wind speed. A model-based control strategy is used to independently maximize both the energy extracted from the wind and the water output of the RO unit. A computer model of the system has been developed based on component models, identified through laboratory testing. Performance predictions are presented and discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-16
Number of pages8
JournalDesalination
Volume153
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Reverse osmosis
Seawater
seawater
desalination
Desalination
electricity supply
wind turbine
Water
Turbogenerators
wind velocity
Wind turbines
Energy storage
water
Electricity
resource
prediction
energy
battery
reverse osmosis
Testing

Keywords

  • seawater
  • reverse-osmosis
  • wind
  • wind power

Cite this

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title = "A wind-powered seawater reverse-osmosis system without batteries",
abstract = "The development of small-scale stand-alone desalination systems is important to communities on islands and in isolated inland areas. In such places, electricity supplies are often expensive and unreliable, while the wind resource is abundant. The system presented here comprises a 2.2 kW wind turbine generator powering a variable-flow Reverse osmosis (RO) desalination unit. It is highly efficient, rugged, built with off-the-shelf components and suitable for use in remote areas. Operation at variable-flow allows the uncertainty and variability of the wind to be accommodated without need of energy storage. Batteries, which are common in stand-alone systems, are avoided and water production is dependent on the instantaneous wind speed. A model-based control strategy is used to independently maximize both the energy extracted from the wind and the water output of the RO unit. A computer model of the system has been developed based on component models, identified through laboratory testing. Performance predictions are presented and discussed.",
keywords = "seawater , reverse-osmosis , wind , wind power",
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A wind-powered seawater reverse-osmosis system without batteries. / Infield, D.G.

In: Desalination, Vol. 153, No. 1-3, 2002, p. 9-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Infield, D.G.

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N2 - The development of small-scale stand-alone desalination systems is important to communities on islands and in isolated inland areas. In such places, electricity supplies are often expensive and unreliable, while the wind resource is abundant. The system presented here comprises a 2.2 kW wind turbine generator powering a variable-flow Reverse osmosis (RO) desalination unit. It is highly efficient, rugged, built with off-the-shelf components and suitable for use in remote areas. Operation at variable-flow allows the uncertainty and variability of the wind to be accommodated without need of energy storage. Batteries, which are common in stand-alone systems, are avoided and water production is dependent on the instantaneous wind speed. A model-based control strategy is used to independently maximize both the energy extracted from the wind and the water output of the RO unit. A computer model of the system has been developed based on component models, identified through laboratory testing. Performance predictions are presented and discussed.

AB - The development of small-scale stand-alone desalination systems is important to communities on islands and in isolated inland areas. In such places, electricity supplies are often expensive and unreliable, while the wind resource is abundant. The system presented here comprises a 2.2 kW wind turbine generator powering a variable-flow Reverse osmosis (RO) desalination unit. It is highly efficient, rugged, built with off-the-shelf components and suitable for use in remote areas. Operation at variable-flow allows the uncertainty and variability of the wind to be accommodated without need of energy storage. Batteries, which are common in stand-alone systems, are avoided and water production is dependent on the instantaneous wind speed. A model-based control strategy is used to independently maximize both the energy extracted from the wind and the water output of the RO unit. A computer model of the system has been developed based on component models, identified through laboratory testing. Performance predictions are presented and discussed.

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KW - wind

KW - wind power

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