A two-step optimization model for quantifying the flexibility potential of power-to-heat systems in dwellings

Gbemi Oluleye, John Allison, Graeme Hawker, Nick Kelly, Adam D. Hawkes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coupling the electricity and heat sectors is receiving interest as a potential source of flexibility to help absorb surplus renewable electricity. The flexibility afforded by power-to-heat systems in dwellings has yet to be quantified in terms of time, energy and costs, and especially in cases where homeowners are heterogeneous prosumers. Flexibility quantification whilst accounting for prosumer heterogeneity is non-trivial. Therefore in this work a novel two-step optimization framework is proposed to quantify the potential of prosumers to absorb surplus renewable electricity through the integration of air source heat pumps and thermal energy storage. The first step is formulated as a multi-period mixed integer linear programming problem to determine the optimal energy system, and the quantity of surplus electricity absorbed. The second step is formulated as a linear programming problem to determine the price a prosumer will accept for absorbing surplus electricity, and thus the number of active prosumers in the market. A case study of 445 prosumers is presented to illustrate the approach. Results show that the number of active prosumers is affected by the quantity of absorbed electricity, frequency of requests, the price offered by aggregators and how prosumers determine the acceptable value of flexibility provided. This study is a step towards reducing the need for renewable curtailment and increasing pricing transparency in relation to demand-side response.

LanguageEnglish
Pages215-228
Number of pages14
JournalApplied Energy
Volume228
Early online date23 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

electricity
Electricity
linear programing
Linear programming
Air source heat pumps
homeowner
Thermal energy
transparency
Transparency
Energy storage
energy
dwelling
Hot Temperature
Costs
market
surplus
air
cost
price

Keywords

  • air source heat pump
  • demand-side response
  • flexibility
  • power-to-heat
  • surplus electricity
  • thermal energy storage

Cite this

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abstract = "Coupling the electricity and heat sectors is receiving interest as a potential source of flexibility to help absorb surplus renewable electricity. The flexibility afforded by power-to-heat systems in dwellings has yet to be quantified in terms of time, energy and costs, and especially in cases where homeowners are heterogeneous prosumers. Flexibility quantification whilst accounting for prosumer heterogeneity is non-trivial. Therefore in this work a novel two-step optimization framework is proposed to quantify the potential of prosumers to absorb surplus renewable electricity through the integration of air source heat pumps and thermal energy storage. The first step is formulated as a multi-period mixed integer linear programming problem to determine the optimal energy system, and the quantity of surplus electricity absorbed. The second step is formulated as a linear programming problem to determine the price a prosumer will accept for absorbing surplus electricity, and thus the number of active prosumers in the market. A case study of 445 prosumers is presented to illustrate the approach. Results show that the number of active prosumers is affected by the quantity of absorbed electricity, frequency of requests, the price offered by aggregators and how prosumers determine the acceptable value of flexibility provided. This study is a step towards reducing the need for renewable curtailment and increasing pricing transparency in relation to demand-side response.",
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A two-step optimization model for quantifying the flexibility potential of power-to-heat systems in dwellings. / Oluleye, Gbemi; Allison, John; Hawker, Graeme; Kelly, Nick; Hawkes, Adam D.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 228, 15.10.2018, p. 215-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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