A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions

Michael G. Oladokun, Ibrahim A. Motawa, Phillip F. G. Banfill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

There have been concerns over sustainability issues around the world, especially when it comes to the way energy is used and corresponding environmental impacts in the form of climate change, global warming, etc. Reduction in household energy consumption is seen as a way to curtail this menace. This paper argues that the issue of household energy consumption and CO2 emissions (HECCE) is a complex technical and social phenomenon that needs to be understood from both engineering and social science perspectives. This research used the concept of socio-technical systems as the theoretical framework. The research applied system dynamics as both the methodology and tool to model HECCE. The result is a population of outcomes for the HECCE in the form of space heating, hot water, artificial lighting, appliances, and cooking. The tool produced is an intuitive one with the capability of replicating reality as evidenced from the outcomes of validation done. Sensitivity analysis ofdifferent policy levers (occupants? behaviour, insulation level, etc) can therefore be done with the tool. It is concluded that the outcomes of this study would go a long way in helping decision makers draw more realistic policies for household energy consumption which is critical to the CO2 emissions reduction agenda of the government.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9
EditorsRobert Eberlein, Ignacio J. Martinez-Moyano
Pages2542-2552
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2013
Event31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: 21 Jul 201325 Jul 2013
http://www.systemdynamics.org/conferences/2013/proceed/index.html

Conference

Conference31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period21/07/1325/07/13
Internet address

Fingerprint

household energy
carbon emission
Dynamical systems
Energy utilization
Carbon
Space heating
Social sciences
Cooking
Global warming
insulation
Climate change
Sensitivity analysis
Environmental impact
sensitivity analysis
Insulation
Sustainable development
global warming
environmental impact
Lighting
energy consumption

Keywords

  • household energy
  • household carbon emissions
  • socio-technical systems
  • system dynamics

Cite this

Oladokun, M. G., Motawa, I. A., & Banfill, P. F. G. (2013). A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions. In R. Eberlein, & I. J. Martinez-Moyano (Eds.), Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9 (pp. 2542-2552)
Oladokun, Michael G. ; Motawa, Ibrahim A. ; Banfill, Phillip F. G. / A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions. Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9. editor / Robert Eberlein ; Ignacio J. Martinez-Moyano. 2013. pp. 2542-2552
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Oladokun, MG, Motawa, IA & Banfill, PFG 2013, A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions. in R Eberlein & IJ Martinez-Moyano (eds), Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9. pp. 2542-2552, 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, Cambridge, MA, United States, 21/07/13.

A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions. / Oladokun, Michael G.; Motawa, Ibrahim A.; Banfill, Phillip F. G.

Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9. ed. / Robert Eberlein; Ignacio J. Martinez-Moyano. 2013. p. 2542-2552.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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T1 - A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions

AU - Oladokun, Michael G.

AU - Motawa, Ibrahim A.

AU - Banfill, Phillip F. G.

PY - 2013/7/21

Y1 - 2013/7/21

N2 - There have been concerns over sustainability issues around the world, especially when it comes to the way energy is used and corresponding environmental impacts in the form of climate change, global warming, etc. Reduction in household energy consumption is seen as a way to curtail this menace. This paper argues that the issue of household energy consumption and CO2 emissions (HECCE) is a complex technical and social phenomenon that needs to be understood from both engineering and social science perspectives. This research used the concept of socio-technical systems as the theoretical framework. The research applied system dynamics as both the methodology and tool to model HECCE. The result is a population of outcomes for the HECCE in the form of space heating, hot water, artificial lighting, appliances, and cooking. The tool produced is an intuitive one with the capability of replicating reality as evidenced from the outcomes of validation done. Sensitivity analysis ofdifferent policy levers (occupants? behaviour, insulation level, etc) can therefore be done with the tool. It is concluded that the outcomes of this study would go a long way in helping decision makers draw more realistic policies for household energy consumption which is critical to the CO2 emissions reduction agenda of the government.

AB - There have been concerns over sustainability issues around the world, especially when it comes to the way energy is used and corresponding environmental impacts in the form of climate change, global warming, etc. Reduction in household energy consumption is seen as a way to curtail this menace. This paper argues that the issue of household energy consumption and CO2 emissions (HECCE) is a complex technical and social phenomenon that needs to be understood from both engineering and social science perspectives. This research used the concept of socio-technical systems as the theoretical framework. The research applied system dynamics as both the methodology and tool to model HECCE. The result is a population of outcomes for the HECCE in the form of space heating, hot water, artificial lighting, appliances, and cooking. The tool produced is an intuitive one with the capability of replicating reality as evidenced from the outcomes of validation done. Sensitivity analysis ofdifferent policy levers (occupants? behaviour, insulation level, etc) can therefore be done with the tool. It is concluded that the outcomes of this study would go a long way in helping decision makers draw more realistic policies for household energy consumption which is critical to the CO2 emissions reduction agenda of the government.

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KW - household carbon emissions

KW - socio-technical systems

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UR - http://www.systemdynamics.org/conferences/2013/proceed/papers/P1332.pdf

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M3 - Conference contribution book

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BT - Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9

A2 - Eberlein, Robert

A2 - Martinez-Moyano, Ignacio J.

ER -

Oladokun MG, Motawa IA, Banfill PFG. A system dynamics-based model of the socio-technical systems of household energy and carbon emissions. In Eberlein R, Martinez-Moyano IJ, editors, Proceedings of the 31st International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 21-25 July, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, ISBN 978-1-935056-11-9. 2013. p. 2542-2552