A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency over a wide operating range

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency is presented. The system promises to deliver up to 460 l/h of potable water, from seawater (at 40,000 ppm), while consuming less than 1600 W of electrical power. This represents a specific energy consumption of less than 3.5 kWh/m3. Moreover, the flow may be controlled in order to reduce the power consumption by a factor of four without any significant loss of efficiency — the specific energy consumption remains near to 3.5 kWh/m3. The keys to these impressive figures are the energy recovery provided by the Clark pump, from Spectra Watermakers Inc., and the use of a variable water recovery ratio control algorithm, developed by CREST. The significance of the system is that it may be operated from variable intermittent renewable-energy sources, such as wind and solar-photovoltaic (PV), without need of batteries. Results of laboratory testing and extensive modeling are presented.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-236
Number of pages8
JournalDesalination
Volume153
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Reverse osmosis
Seawater
energy efficiency
Energy efficiency
Energy utilization
seawater
Recovery
electrical power
Potable water
Drinking Water
pump
Electric power utilization
drinking water
Pumps
Water
Testing
modeling
water
reverse osmosis
energy consumption

Keywords

  • wind
  • desalination
  • photovoltaic
  • renewable energy
  • solar
  • PV
  • seawater
  • reverse osmosis
  • energy recovery

Cite this

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title = "A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency over a wide operating range",
abstract = "A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency is presented. The system promises to deliver up to 460 l/h of potable water, from seawater (at 40,000 ppm), while consuming less than 1600 W of electrical power. This represents a specific energy consumption of less than 3.5 kWh/m3. Moreover, the flow may be controlled in order to reduce the power consumption by a factor of four without any significant loss of efficiency — the specific energy consumption remains near to 3.5 kWh/m3. The keys to these impressive figures are the energy recovery provided by the Clark pump, from Spectra Watermakers Inc., and the use of a variable water recovery ratio control algorithm, developed by CREST. The significance of the system is that it may be operated from variable intermittent renewable-energy sources, such as wind and solar-photovoltaic (PV), without need of batteries. Results of laboratory testing and extensive modeling are presented.",
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author = "D.G. Infield",
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A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency over a wide operating range. / Infield, D.G.

In: Desalination, Vol. 153, No. 1-3, 2002, p. 229-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency over a wide operating range

AU - Infield, D.G.

PY - 2002

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N2 - A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency is presented. The system promises to deliver up to 460 l/h of potable water, from seawater (at 40,000 ppm), while consuming less than 1600 W of electrical power. This represents a specific energy consumption of less than 3.5 kWh/m3. Moreover, the flow may be controlled in order to reduce the power consumption by a factor of four without any significant loss of efficiency — the specific energy consumption remains near to 3.5 kWh/m3. The keys to these impressive figures are the energy recovery provided by the Clark pump, from Spectra Watermakers Inc., and the use of a variable water recovery ratio control algorithm, developed by CREST. The significance of the system is that it may be operated from variable intermittent renewable-energy sources, such as wind and solar-photovoltaic (PV), without need of batteries. Results of laboratory testing and extensive modeling are presented.

AB - A small-scale seawater reverse-osmosis system with excellent energy efficiency is presented. The system promises to deliver up to 460 l/h of potable water, from seawater (at 40,000 ppm), while consuming less than 1600 W of electrical power. This represents a specific energy consumption of less than 3.5 kWh/m3. Moreover, the flow may be controlled in order to reduce the power consumption by a factor of four without any significant loss of efficiency — the specific energy consumption remains near to 3.5 kWh/m3. The keys to these impressive figures are the energy recovery provided by the Clark pump, from Spectra Watermakers Inc., and the use of a variable water recovery ratio control algorithm, developed by CREST. The significance of the system is that it may be operated from variable intermittent renewable-energy sources, such as wind and solar-photovoltaic (PV), without need of batteries. Results of laboratory testing and extensive modeling are presented.

KW - wind

KW - desalination

KW - photovoltaic

KW - renewable energy

KW - solar

KW - PV

KW - seawater

KW - reverse osmosis

KW - energy recovery

U2 - 10.1016/S0011-9164(02)01141-4

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JO - Desalination

JF - Desalination

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