A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain

Aleksandra Vuckovic, Muhammad A. Hasan, Matthew Fraser, Bernie Conway, David B. Allan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of neurofeedback training on central neuropathic pain in patients with chronic paraplegia. Patients EEG activity was modulated from the central areas of the cortex, electrode location C3/Cz/C4. Training consisted of reducing EEG power in theta (4-8 Hz) and higher beta (20-30 Hz) frequency ranges and increasing power in the higher alpha range (9-12 Hz). Patients received 20-40 neurofeedback treatment and four out of five patients reported clinically significant reduction of pain (>30%). EEG during neurofeedback revealed a wide spread modulation of power in all three frequency bands accompanied with changes in the coherence. LORETA analysis of EEG before and after neurofeedback therapy revealed general reduction of power in all frequency bands, most notably in 12-15 Hz and 20-30 Hz bands. Areas with reduced power included the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and the Insular Cortex, known to be involved in processing of chronic pain. Further studies on larger number of patients will be needed to confirm clinical relevance of neurofeedback therapy for treatment of central neuropathic pain.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationReplace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014
EditorsWinnie Jensen, Ole Kæseler Andersen, Metin Akay
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherSpringer
Pages823-831
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9783319080710
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2014

Publication series

NameBiosystems and Biorobotics
ISSN (Print)2195-3562

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Frequency bands
Modulation
Electrodes
Processing

Keywords

  • complex regional pain syndrome
  • primary motor cortex
  • alpha band
  • beta band
  • neurofeedback training

Cite this

Vuckovic, A., Hasan, M. A., Fraser, M., Conway, B., & Allan, D. B. (2014). A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain. In W. Jensen, O. K. Andersen, & M. Akay (Eds.), Replace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014 (pp. 823-831). (Biosystems and Biorobotics). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08072-7_113
Vuckovic, Aleksandra ; Hasan, Muhammad A. ; Fraser, Matthew ; Conway, Bernie ; Allan, David B. / A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain. Replace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014. editor / Winnie Jensen ; Ole Kæseler Andersen ; Metin Akay. Cham, Switzerland : Springer, 2014. pp. 823-831 (Biosystems and Biorobotics).
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Vuckovic, A, Hasan, MA, Fraser, M, Conway, B & Allan, DB 2014, A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain. in W Jensen, OK Andersen & M Akay (eds), Replace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014. Biosystems and Biorobotics, Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 823-831. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08072-7_113

A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain. / Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Hasan, Muhammad A.; Fraser, Matthew; Conway, Bernie; Allan, David B.

Replace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014. ed. / Winnie Jensen; Ole Kæseler Andersen; Metin Akay. Cham, Switzerland : Springer, 2014. p. 823-831 (Biosystems and Biorobotics).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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Vuckovic A, Hasan MA, Fraser M, Conway B, Allan DB. A pilot study on clinical and neurological effects of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain. In Jensen W, Andersen OK, Akay M, editors, Replace, Repair, Restore, Relieve – Bridging Clinical and Engineering Solutions in Neurorehabilitation: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2014), Aalborg, 24-26 June, 2014. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. 2014. p. 823-831. (Biosystems and Biorobotics). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08072-7_113