A multilevel examination of skills-oriented HRM and perceived skill utilization during recession: Implications for the wellbeing of all workers

Belgin Okay-Somerville, Dora Scholarios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines whether organizations can enhance employee wellbeing by adopting human resource management (HRM) practices strategically targeted to improve skill development and deployment in a recessionary context. Employee skill utilization is proposed as the mediating mechanism between HRM practice and wellbeing. The role of workplace skill composition is also examined as a boundary condition within which HRM differentially impacts employee outcomes. Using a nationally representative survey of UK workplaces (Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2011) and matched management and employee data, the analysis focused on organizations which had implemented some recessionary action following the 2008-09 global financial and economic crisis. The findings show that human capital enhancing HRM and enriched job design positively influenced both job satisfaction and work-related affective wellbeing through increased employee skill utilization. Organizations with predominantly high-skilled workforces were more likely to adopt these skills-oriented HRM practices. Nevertheless, the effects of HRM on employee outcomes via skill utilization applied across organizations, regardless of workforce skill composition. The findings demonstrate employee skill utilization as a driver of HRM outcomes and the sustainability of 'best practice' HRM arguments across all skill levels, even in the face of recession.
LanguageEnglish
JournalHuman Resource Management
Early online date2 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Oct 2018

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Human resource management
Personnel
Practice Management
Organizations
Workplace
Job satisfaction
Economics
Workers
Well-being
Recession
Job Satisfaction
Chemical analysis
Practice Guidelines
Employees
Sustainable development
Boundary conditions

Keywords

  • skill
  • wellbeing
  • human resource management (HRM)
  • recession

Cite this

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