A multicenter point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in Punjab, Pakistan: findings and implications

Zikria Saleem, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad Hassali, Ann Versporten, Brian Godman, Furqan Khurshid Hashmi, Herman Goossens, Fahad Saleem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: In line with the recent global action plan for antimicrobial resistance, the first time such a comprehensive survey has been undertaken in Pakistan, sixth most populous country. Method: This point prevalence survey (PPS) was conducted in 13 hospitals among 7 different cities of Pakistan. The survey included all inpatients receiving an antibiotic on the day of PPS. A web-based application was used for data entry, validation, and reporting as designed by the University of Antwerp. Results: Out of 1954 patients, 1516 (77.6%) were treated with antibiotics. Top three most reported indications for antibiotic use were prophylaxis for obstetrics or gynaecological indications (16.5%) and gastrointestinal indications (12.6%) and lower respiratory tract infections (12.0%). Top three most commonly prescribed antibiotics were ceftriaxone (35.0%), metronidazole (16.0%) and ciprofloxacin (6.0%). Out of total indications, 34.2% of antibiotics were prescribed for community-acquired infections (CAI), 5.9% for healthcare-associated infections (HAI), and 57.4% for either surgical or medical prophylaxis. Of total surgical prophylaxis, 97.4% of antibiotics were given for more than one day. Conclusion: Study concluded that unnecessary prophylactic antibiotic use is extremely high and broad-spectrum prescribing is common. There is a considerable need to work on a national action plan of Pakistan on antibiotic resistance.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalExpert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Feb 2019

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Pakistan
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Community-Acquired Infections
Ceftriaxone
Metronidazole
Ciprofloxacin
Microbial Drug Resistance
Cross Infection
Surveys and Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections
Obstetrics
Inpatients

Keywords

  • point prevalence survey
  • antimicrobial prescribing
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • hospitals
  • Pakistan

Cite this

Saleem, Z., Hassali, M. A. A., Versporten, A., Godman, B., Hashmi, F. K., Goossens, H., & Saleem, F. (Accepted/In press). A multicenter point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in Punjab, Pakistan: findings and implications. Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy.
Saleem, Zikria ; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad ; Versporten, Ann ; Godman, Brian ; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid ; Goossens, Herman ; Saleem, Fahad. / A multicenter point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in Punjab, Pakistan : findings and implications. In: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy. 2019.
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A multicenter point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in Punjab, Pakistan : findings and implications. / Saleem, Zikria ; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Versporten, Ann; Godman, Brian; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid ; Goossens, Herman ; Saleem, Fahad.

In: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy, 06.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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