A medication adherence risk assessment tool (RAT) compared with medication adherence report scale (MARS)

Farah Alhomoud, Ian Millar, Julienne Johnson, Stephen Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

Abstract

In the UK, 36% of patients aged C65 years take more than three medicines. As age advances physical and cognitive skills deficits place patients at risk of treatment failure due to non-adherence to prescribed medications. ‘Compliance aids’ are often used to help patients self administer medication; in spite of lack of good evidence to support their use. Compliance aids are often used without appropriate patient assessment or clear identification of the specific deficits. Most medication adherence assessment tools rely on patients self reporting their perceived compliance behaviour. We report from an ongoing study to develop compliance risk assessment tools. This study was conducted in sheltered housing organisations with a high functioning patient group some of whom were using ‘compliance aids’ supplied by their pharmacists.

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Medication Adherence
Risk assessment
Compliance
Medicine
Treatment Failure
Pharmacists
Organizations

Keywords

  • risk assessment tool
  • medication adherence report scale
  • pharmacists
  • compliance
  • medication adherence
  • patient assessment

Cite this

Alhomoud, Farah ; Millar, Ian ; Johnson, Julienne ; Hudson, Stephen. / A medication adherence risk assessment tool (RAT) compared with medication adherence report scale (MARS). In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 362-363.
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abstract = "In the UK, 36{\%} of patients aged C65 years take more than three medicines. As age advances physical and cognitive skills deficits place patients at risk of treatment failure due to non-adherence to prescribed medications. ‘Compliance aids’ are often used to help patients self administer medication; in spite of lack of good evidence to support their use. Compliance aids are often used without appropriate patient assessment or clear identification of the specific deficits. Most medication adherence assessment tools rely on patients self reporting their perceived compliance behaviour. We report from an ongoing study to develop compliance risk assessment tools. This study was conducted in sheltered housing organisations with a high functioning patient group some of whom were using ‘compliance aids’ supplied by their pharmacists.",
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A medication adherence risk assessment tool (RAT) compared with medication adherence report scale (MARS). / Alhomoud, Farah; Millar, Ian; Johnson, Julienne; Hudson, Stephen.

In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2011, p. 362-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

TY - JOUR

T1 - A medication adherence risk assessment tool (RAT) compared with medication adherence report scale (MARS)

AU - Alhomoud, Farah

AU - Millar, Ian

AU - Johnson, Julienne

AU - Hudson, Stephen

N1 - 39th ESCP European symposium on clinical pharmacy & 13th SFPC congress: clinical pharmacy at the front line of innovations. 21–23 October 2010, Lyon, France

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - In the UK, 36% of patients aged C65 years take more than three medicines. As age advances physical and cognitive skills deficits place patients at risk of treatment failure due to non-adherence to prescribed medications. ‘Compliance aids’ are often used to help patients self administer medication; in spite of lack of good evidence to support their use. Compliance aids are often used without appropriate patient assessment or clear identification of the specific deficits. Most medication adherence assessment tools rely on patients self reporting their perceived compliance behaviour. We report from an ongoing study to develop compliance risk assessment tools. This study was conducted in sheltered housing organisations with a high functioning patient group some of whom were using ‘compliance aids’ supplied by their pharmacists.

AB - In the UK, 36% of patients aged C65 years take more than three medicines. As age advances physical and cognitive skills deficits place patients at risk of treatment failure due to non-adherence to prescribed medications. ‘Compliance aids’ are often used to help patients self administer medication; in spite of lack of good evidence to support their use. Compliance aids are often used without appropriate patient assessment or clear identification of the specific deficits. Most medication adherence assessment tools rely on patients self reporting their perceived compliance behaviour. We report from an ongoing study to develop compliance risk assessment tools. This study was conducted in sheltered housing organisations with a high functioning patient group some of whom were using ‘compliance aids’ supplied by their pharmacists.

KW - risk assessment tool

KW - medication adherence report scale

KW - pharmacists

KW - compliance

KW - medication adherence

KW - patient assessment

U2 - 10.1007/s11096-011-9481-6

DO - 10.1007/s11096-011-9481-6

M3 - Conference Contribution

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SP - 362

EP - 363

JO - International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

T2 - International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

JF - International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy

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