A comparative study of ozone generation using pulsed and continuous AC dielectric barrier discharges

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Abstract

This paper presents a comparative study of ozone generation under pulsed and continuous ac dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). An oxygen-fed DBD reactor with a narrow discharge gap of 0.4 mm was used in the experiments. DBD discharge modes under pulsed and continuous ac energisation were investigated and compared in this work. Negative impulses with the pulse length of 500 ns and repetition rate of 200 pps were employed to produce ozone at four different concentrations of 18.4 g/Nm3, 34.8 g/Nm3, 38.1 g/Nm3 and 52.5 g/Nm3, while in the case of ac energisation, sinusoidal voltage with the frequency of 25 kHz was applied to produce ozone at similar concentrations. The discharge power and ozone production efficiency at these ozone concentrations were obtained and compared for both energisation modes. It is shown that both pulsed and continuous ac dielectric barrier discharges have a filamentary mode and continuous ac energisation results in 18% increase in the efficiency as compared with pulsed energisation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDigest of Technical Papers - IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference
Place of PublicationSan Francisco, CA
PublisherIEEE
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781467351676
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event2013 19th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (PPC) - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 16 Jun 201321 Jun 2013

Conference

Conference2013 19th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (PPC)
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period16/06/1321/06/13

Keywords

  • dielectric barrier discharges
  • ozone generation
  • pulsed power
  • comparative studies
  • filamentary mode
  • ozone concentration
  • ozone production
  • repitition rate
  • sinusoidal voltage

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