A comparative analysis of process and product with specialist and generalist pre-service teachers involved in a group composition activity

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Abstract

The study set out to investigate apparent differences in both the process and product between two groups of students who were set the task of creating a piece of original music. One group was classified as 'specialists', having studied music at degree-level for at least 3 years. The second group was considered 'generalists', preparing for a career as generalist primary teachers and having no tertiary-level musical training. Some significant differences were apparent between the two groups, particularly in the confidence with which they approached the task and the subsequent effect this may have had on the music produced. The paper reports a number of these effects, including choice and use of stimuli, the management of structural aspects such as melody, harmony, tempo, form and dynamics, and the various roles taken on by different group members. The significance of these findings for teacher educators is discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Pages25-36
Number of pages11
JournalMusic Education Research
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2002

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music
teacher
Group
group membership
stimulus
confidence
career
educator
Pre-service Teachers
Comparative Analysis
Music
management
student
Musical Training
Melody
Harmony
Educators
Stimulus
Confidence

Keywords

  • original music
  • creation
  • specialists
  • study
  • degree-level
  • generalists
  • tertiary-level
  • musical training

Cite this

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abstract = "The study set out to investigate apparent differences in both the process and product between two groups of students who were set the task of creating a piece of original music. One group was classified as 'specialists', having studied music at degree-level for at least 3 years. The second group was considered 'generalists', preparing for a career as generalist primary teachers and having no tertiary-level musical training. Some significant differences were apparent between the two groups, particularly in the confidence with which they approached the task and the subsequent effect this may have had on the music produced. The paper reports a number of these effects, including choice and use of stimuli, the management of structural aspects such as melody, harmony, tempo, form and dynamics, and the various roles taken on by different group members. The significance of these findings for teacher educators is discussed.",
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AB - The study set out to investigate apparent differences in both the process and product between two groups of students who were set the task of creating a piece of original music. One group was classified as 'specialists', having studied music at degree-level for at least 3 years. The second group was considered 'generalists', preparing for a career as generalist primary teachers and having no tertiary-level musical training. Some significant differences were apparent between the two groups, particularly in the confidence with which they approached the task and the subsequent effect this may have had on the music produced. The paper reports a number of these effects, including choice and use of stimuli, the management of structural aspects such as melody, harmony, tempo, form and dynamics, and the various roles taken on by different group members. The significance of these findings for teacher educators is discussed.

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