A cisplatin slow-release hydrogel drug delivery system based on a formulation of the macrocycle cucurbit[7]uril, gelatin and polyvinyl alcohol

Rabbab Oun, Jane A. Plumb, Nial J. Wheate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The anticancer drug cisplatin was encapsulated within the cucurbit[7]uril macrocycle to form the host-guest complex: cisplatin@CB[7]. This was then incorporated into gelatin and 0-4% w/v polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based hydrogels as slow release drug delivery vehicles. The hydrogels demonstrated predicable swelling and disintegration dependent on the PVA concentration. The hydrogel with the highest PVA content was slower to swell and release drug compared with lower concentrations of PVA. The effect of the hydrogel PVA concentration on in vitro cytotoxicity was examined using A2780/CP70 ovarian cancer cells. Over the 24 h drug exposure time used, hydrogels containing 4% PVA showed a 20% decrease in viable cells compared to the control, whereas hydrogels containing 0% and 2% PVA induced an 80% and 45% inhibition of cell growth, respectively. There was no measurable difference in the in vitro cytotoxicity of free cisplatin and cisplatin@CB[7] containing hydrogels. Finally, the in vivo effectiveness of a 2%-PVA hydrogel implanted under the skin of nude mice bearing A2780/CP70 xenografts showed that low dose hydrogels containing cisplatin@CB[7] (30 μg equivalent of drug) was just as effective as an intraperitoneal high dose administration of free cisplatin (150 μg) at inhibiting tumour growth. 

LanguageEnglish
Pages100-105
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Inorganic Biochemistry
Volume134
Early online date18 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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Polyvinyl Alcohol
Hydrogels
Hydrogel
Gelatin
Drug Delivery Systems
Cisplatin
Cytotoxicity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Bearings (structural)
Disintegration
Cell growth
Growth
Drug delivery
Heterografts
Nude Mice
Ovarian Neoplasms
Swelling
cucurbit(7)uril
Tumors
Skin

Keywords

  • cisplatin
  • cucurbituril
  • drug delivery
  • hydrogel
  • polyvinyl alcohol
  • slow release

Cite this

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abstract = "The anticancer drug cisplatin was encapsulated within the cucurbit[7]uril macrocycle to form the host-guest complex: cisplatin@CB[7]. This was then incorporated into gelatin and 0-4{\%} w/v polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based hydrogels as slow release drug delivery vehicles. The hydrogels demonstrated predicable swelling and disintegration dependent on the PVA concentration. The hydrogel with the highest PVA content was slower to swell and release drug compared with lower concentrations of PVA. The effect of the hydrogel PVA concentration on in vitro cytotoxicity was examined using A2780/CP70 ovarian cancer cells. Over the 24 h drug exposure time used, hydrogels containing 4{\%} PVA showed a 20{\%} decrease in viable cells compared to the control, whereas hydrogels containing 0{\%} and 2{\%} PVA induced an 80{\%} and 45{\%} inhibition of cell growth, respectively. There was no measurable difference in the in vitro cytotoxicity of free cisplatin and cisplatin@CB[7] containing hydrogels. Finally, the in vivo effectiveness of a 2{\%}-PVA hydrogel implanted under the skin of nude mice bearing A2780/CP70 xenografts showed that low dose hydrogels containing cisplatin@CB[7] (30 μg equivalent of drug) was just as effective as an intraperitoneal high dose administration of free cisplatin (150 μg) at inhibiting tumour growth. ",
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A cisplatin slow-release hydrogel drug delivery system based on a formulation of the macrocycle cucurbit[7]uril, gelatin and polyvinyl alcohol. / Oun, Rabbab; Plumb, Jane A.; Wheate, Nial J.

In: Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, Vol. 134, 05.2014, p. 100-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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