A call for renewal in tourism ethnographic research

the researcher as both the subject and object of knowledge

Kevin O'Gorman, Andrew MacLaren, Derek Bryce

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Our critique of tourism ethnographic research argues that too much existing published work tends to cite preceding studies as methodological precedents without stating how particular approaches were operationalised. Moreover, findings are often presented as individual cases with limited utility in terms of theory building or wider understanding of contextual phenomena. We argue that closer attention, first to current developments within anthropology, which seek to overcome researcher naivety and second, greater philosophical reflexivity, would elevate both the rigour with which such work is undertaken and the seriousness with which it is received in the wider academy. We call for a double-reflexivity in ethnographic research in tourism that accepts both the specific situational nature of individual studies and the wider discursive frames within which they are embedded. We call for constant reflection on, and acknowledgment of, this duality in ethnographic research where, after all, the researcher is so intimately embedded in empirical and subjective terms.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages14
    JournalCurrent Issues in Tourism
    Early online date12 Sep 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Sep 2012

    Fingerprint

    tourism
    Tourism
    reflexivity
    anthropology
    academy
    Renewal
    Reflexivity
    Tourism research
    Theory building
    Anthropology
    Duality

    Keywords

    • cultural tourism
    • philosophy
    • subjectivity
    • reflexivity
    • ethnography

    Cite this

    @article{4b6c64821a5240f5851166cf115f576a,
    title = "A call for renewal in tourism ethnographic research: the researcher as both the subject and object of knowledge",
    abstract = "Our critique of tourism ethnographic research argues that too much existing published work tends to cite preceding studies as methodological precedents without stating how particular approaches were operationalised. Moreover, findings are often presented as individual cases with limited utility in terms of theory building or wider understanding of contextual phenomena. We argue that closer attention, first to current developments within anthropology, which seek to overcome researcher naivety and second, greater philosophical reflexivity, would elevate both the rigour with which such work is undertaken and the seriousness with which it is received in the wider academy. We call for a double-reflexivity in ethnographic research in tourism that accepts both the specific situational nature of individual studies and the wider discursive frames within which they are embedded. We call for constant reflection on, and acknowledgment of, this duality in ethnographic research where, after all, the researcher is so intimately embedded in empirical and subjective terms.",
    keywords = "cultural tourism, philosophy, subjectivity, reflexivity, ethnography",
    author = "Kevin O'Gorman and Andrew MacLaren and Derek Bryce",
    year = "2012",
    month = "9",
    day = "12",
    doi = "10.1080/13683500.2012.718321",
    language = "English",
    journal = "Current Issues in Tourism",
    issn = "1368-3500",

    }

    A call for renewal in tourism ethnographic research : the researcher as both the subject and object of knowledge. / O'Gorman, Kevin; MacLaren, Andrew; Bryce, Derek.

    In: Current Issues in Tourism, 12.09.2012.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A call for renewal in tourism ethnographic research

    T2 - the researcher as both the subject and object of knowledge

    AU - O'Gorman, Kevin

    AU - MacLaren, Andrew

    AU - Bryce, Derek

    PY - 2012/9/12

    Y1 - 2012/9/12

    N2 - Our critique of tourism ethnographic research argues that too much existing published work tends to cite preceding studies as methodological precedents without stating how particular approaches were operationalised. Moreover, findings are often presented as individual cases with limited utility in terms of theory building or wider understanding of contextual phenomena. We argue that closer attention, first to current developments within anthropology, which seek to overcome researcher naivety and second, greater philosophical reflexivity, would elevate both the rigour with which such work is undertaken and the seriousness with which it is received in the wider academy. We call for a double-reflexivity in ethnographic research in tourism that accepts both the specific situational nature of individual studies and the wider discursive frames within which they are embedded. We call for constant reflection on, and acknowledgment of, this duality in ethnographic research where, after all, the researcher is so intimately embedded in empirical and subjective terms.

    AB - Our critique of tourism ethnographic research argues that too much existing published work tends to cite preceding studies as methodological precedents without stating how particular approaches were operationalised. Moreover, findings are often presented as individual cases with limited utility in terms of theory building or wider understanding of contextual phenomena. We argue that closer attention, first to current developments within anthropology, which seek to overcome researcher naivety and second, greater philosophical reflexivity, would elevate both the rigour with which such work is undertaken and the seriousness with which it is received in the wider academy. We call for a double-reflexivity in ethnographic research in tourism that accepts both the specific situational nature of individual studies and the wider discursive frames within which they are embedded. We call for constant reflection on, and acknowledgment of, this duality in ethnographic research where, after all, the researcher is so intimately embedded in empirical and subjective terms.

    KW - cultural tourism

    KW - philosophy

    KW - subjectivity

    KW - reflexivity

    KW - ethnography

    UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rcit20

    U2 - 10.1080/13683500.2012.718321

    DO - 10.1080/13683500.2012.718321

    M3 - Article

    JO - Current Issues in Tourism

    JF - Current Issues in Tourism

    SN - 1368-3500

    ER -