A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation

Ben S Pickard, Edward J Hollox, M Pat Malloy, David J Porteous, Douglas HR Blackwood, John AL Armour, Walter J Muir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Cryptic structural abnormalities within the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes have been the focus of much recent research because of their discovery in a percentage of people with mental retardation (UK terminology: learning disability). These studies focused on subjects (largely children) with various severities of intellectual impairment with or without additional physical clinical features such as dysmorphisms. However it is well established that prevalence of schizophrenia is around three times greater in those with mild mental retardation. The rates of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder have also been reported as increased in people with mental retardation. We describe here a screen for telomeric abnormalities in a cohort of 69 patients in which mental retardation co-exists with severe psychiatric illness. METHODS: We have applied two techniques, subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH) to detect abnormalities in the patient group. RESULTS: A subtelomeric deletion was discovered involving loss of 4q in a patient with co-morbid schizoaffective disorder and mental retardation. CONCLUSION: The precise region of loss has been defined allowing us to identify genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype through hemizygosity. Interestingly, the region of 4q loss exactly matches that linked to bipolar affective disorder in a large multiply affected Australian kindred.
Original languageEnglish
Article number21
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Medical Genetics
Volume5
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Aug 2004

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Intellectual Disability
Psychiatry
Bipolar Disorder
Learning Disorders
Major Depressive Disorder
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Mood Disorders
Terminology
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Chromosomes
Phenotype
Research
Genes

Keywords

  • chromosome deletion
  • intellectual disabilities
  • nucleic acid hybridization
  • psychotic disorders
  • hybridization

Cite this

Pickard, Ben S ; Hollox, Edward J ; Malloy, M Pat ; Porteous, David J ; Blackwood, Douglas HR ; Armour, John AL ; Muir, Walter J. / A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation. In: BMC Medical Genetics. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 21.
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A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation. / Pickard, Ben S; Hollox, Edward J; Malloy, M Pat; Porteous, David J; Blackwood, Douglas HR; Armour, John AL; Muir, Walter J.

In: BMC Medical Genetics, Vol. 5, No. 21, 21, 13.08.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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