3D-printed futures of manufacturing, social change and technological innovation in China and Singapore: the ghost of a massless future?

Luke Heemsbergen, Angela Daly, Jiajie Lu, Thomas Birtchnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article outlines preliminary findings from a futures forecasting exercise where participants in Shenzhen and Singapore considered the socio-technological construction of 3D printing in terms of work and social change. We offered participants ideal political-economic futures across local–global knowledge and capital–commons dimensions, and then had them backcast the contextual waypoints across markets, culture, policy, law and technology dimensions that help guide towards each future. Their discussion identified various contextually sensitive points, but also tended to dismiss the farthest reaches of each proposed ideal, often reverting to familiar contextual signifiers. Here, we offer discussion on how participants saw culture and industry shaping futures for pertinent political economic concerns in the twenty-first century.

LanguageEnglish
Pages254-270
Number of pages17
JournalScience, Technology and Society
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2019

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Innovation
Economics
Printing
Industry

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • East Asia
  • social change
  • technological innovation
  • work

Cite this

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3D-printed futures of manufacturing, social change and technological innovation in China and Singapore : the ghost of a massless future? / Heemsbergen, Luke; Daly, Angela; Lu, Jiajie; Birtchnell, Thomas.

In: Science, Technology and Society, Vol. 24, No. 2, 29.07.2019, p. 254-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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