100% Open Access by 2020 or disrupting the present scholarly comms landscape: you can't have both? A mid-way update

Pablo de Castro

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

    Abstract

    With the momentum provided by research funders’ Open Access policies like HEFCE’s, Wellcome’s and RCUK’s, Open Access implementation has reached its maturity in the UK. The broad political agreement at the Amsterdam Conference last year to aim for full OA by 2020 at an EU level has added extra leverage to the attempt to progress with large-scale OA implementation across a fairly fragmented policy landscape. Even with the intrinsic contradiction between quickly reaching 100% OA and disrupting the present scholarly communications landscape, there’s a growing consensus that we’re heading towards a ‘new’ situation where Academia may regain some control over its own research output. The presentation looks into the current status of this process, examining the impact of disruptive initiatives like the Open Library of Humanities, the no-hybrid OA policies or Sci-Hub.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1-18
    Number of pages18
    Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2017
    EventReConEvent 2017 - Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation (ECCI), Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Duration: 30 Jun 201730 Jun 2017

    Conference

    ConferenceReConEvent 2017
    Abbreviated titleReCon2017
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityEdinburgh
    Period30/06/1730/06/17

    Fingerprint

    open access
    present
    maturity
    communications
    EU

    Keywords

    • open science
    • Open Access
    • scholarly communications
    • repositories
    • serials crisis
    • open scholarship

    Cite this

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    title = "100{\%} Open Access by 2020 or disrupting the present scholarly comms landscape: you can't have both? A mid-way update",
    abstract = "With the momentum provided by research funders’ Open Access policies like HEFCE’s, Wellcome’s and RCUK’s, Open Access implementation has reached its maturity in the UK. The broad political agreement at the Amsterdam Conference last year to aim for full OA by 2020 at an EU level has added extra leverage to the attempt to progress with large-scale OA implementation across a fairly fragmented policy landscape. Even with the intrinsic contradiction between quickly reaching 100{\%} OA and disrupting the present scholarly communications landscape, there’s a growing consensus that we’re heading towards a ‘new’ situation where Academia may regain some control over its own research output. The presentation looks into the current status of this process, examining the impact of disruptive initiatives like the Open Library of Humanities, the no-hybrid OA policies or Sci-Hub.",
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    author = "{de Castro}, Pablo",
    year = "2017",
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    note = "ReConEvent 2017, ReCon2017 ; Conference date: 30-06-2017 Through 30-06-2017",

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    de Castro, P 2017, '100% Open Access by 2020 or disrupting the present scholarly comms landscape: you can't have both? A mid-way update' ReConEvent 2017, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 30/06/17 - 30/06/17, pp. 1-18.

    100% Open Access by 2020 or disrupting the present scholarly comms landscape : you can't have both? A mid-way update. / de Castro, Pablo.

    2017. 1-18 ReConEvent 2017, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

    TY - CONF

    T1 - 100% Open Access by 2020 or disrupting the present scholarly comms landscape

    T2 - you can't have both? A mid-way update

    AU - de Castro, Pablo

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    KW - open science

    KW - Open Access

    KW - scholarly communications

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    KW - serials crisis

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