Software Defined Radio with the open source RFSoC-PYNQ framework

Activity: Talk or presentation typesOral presentation

Description

This tutorial will present a new software-defined radio (SDR) design flow on the Zynq® UltraScale™ + RFSoC. The design flow exploits the RFSoC’s direct RF sampling data converters and the RFSoC-PYNQ open source framework. RFSoC-PYNQ extends the RFSoC design flow with the JupyterLab integrated development environment (IDE) and the Python programming language. We will demonstrate how combining Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC’s unique hardware capabilities with JupyterLab, and Python’s extensive suite of third-party libraries, can transform the design flow for new SDRs. Using RFSoC-PYNQ, we will demonstrate how designers can use a web browser to interface directly with an RFSoC device and how the framework can be used to rapidly develop and deploy graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for SDR designs. The tutorial will briefly review the RFSoC system architecture and device family. It will introduce the RFSoC-PYNQ framework and it will survey the essential DSP principles underlying multiband Nyquist sampling, frequency planning tools, and up and down converters design for multi-channel architectures. We will present a ‘live’ SDR demonstration of RFSoC-PYNQ with two physical (PHY) layer mobile/cellular radio receiver designs for an 80MHz radio transceiver (4 channels x 20 MHz bands), one with a centre frequency of 700MHz and the other at 3.5GHz. The SDR design flow features open-source design tools, and all the reference designs and examples have been created using the RFSoC-PYNQ framework. To visualize the radio receiver signals, the tutorial will use an open-source spectrum analyser running on the RFSoC to demonstrate the channelization and RF sampling at 700MHz and 3.5GHz. Finally, the tutorial will show new users how they can access the SDR open source learning materials to get started with RFSoC SDR systems design.
Period8 Sept 2021
Event titleXilinx Adapt 2021
Event typeConference
Degree of RecognitionInternational